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Sonic Environments will run from Sunday 10th July until Monday 11th July
NIME will run from Monday 11th July until Friday 15th July.



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Sunday, July 10
 

08:30

Sonic Environments Registration
Sunday July 10, 2016 08:30 - 09:00
Conservatorium's Foyer Queensland Conservatorium

09:00

Sonic Environments Welcome & Opening
Official opening of the conference and welcome from the conference chairs

Dr. Leah Barclay (Griffith University) Co-Chair
President of the Australian Forum for Acoustic Ecology  

Dr. Lindsay Vickery
 (Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts) Co-Chair 
President of the Australasian Computer Music Association



Presenters
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
LV

Lindsay Vickery

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia


Sunday July 10, 2016 09:00 - 09:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

09:00

Sonic Environments Listening Room and Installations

The Sonic Environments program includes a diversity of installations and experiences happening continuously throughout the building. Please download PDF program below for further information on each work. 


Queensland Conservatorium Foyer 

“Aural Fabric: Greenwich” - Alessia Milo

“Reversed Masking” - Mauricio Iregui

 

Room 2.16 (Level 2) 

A’varitia - Silent Greed” - May Wing Joy Chang

 

Room 2.30 (Level 2) 

“Flight Variant” - Teresa Connors 

 

Room 2.26 (Level 2) 

“It is impossible to know about Earth.... so we must hear her voice in our own way” - Johann Diedrick

 

Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre  (Room 3.44, Level 3)  

“Delta Soundings” - Adam Molinski

“The Holy Well Suite” - Dallas Simpson

“Listening Earth” - Andrew Skeoch

“EcoRift Virtual Reality and The Listen(n) Project” - Garth Paine and Sabine Feisst  

“3D-Sound and VR-Audio Demo” - Sabine Breitsameter

“Vanuatu Women’s Water Music” - Sandy Sur and Tom Dick  

“Conservation VR Experiences” - QCRC Music Technology Research Focus Area Group  

“The Kaleidophone – a sonic collage of the Leweton Cultural Experience in Vanuatu” - Toby Gifford and Kate Genevieve

 

Sonic Environments Listening Room (Music Technology Area, Room 3.36) 

“Floating Sound” - Mari Ohno

“Nero ipogeo” - Roberto Zanata

“Les chants de la mer (Songs of the see)” - Gilles Fresnais

“1916” - Daria Baiocchi

“Apax” - Alexis Langevin-Tétrault

“usedlost” - Roger Alsop

“Inhabitated Places_Part III (Three Degrees of Inner Motion)” - Jones Margarucci

“Reverie of Solitude” - Kyle Vanderburg

“A Small Timequake // Of Shifts And Currents” - Cissi Tsang

“What you might have heard..’” - Nigel Frayne

“Cúige (Province)” - Cárthach Ó Nuanáin

 

Immersive Installations (Music Technology Area, IMERSD Live Room) 

“Fluctuant” - Mauricio Iregui and Toby Gifford 

“XIRMINJA NAHPY BERRY” - Pablo Sanz

 

Augmented Reality Soundwalks 

“Ambulation” - Tim Shaw (Sound Walk) 

“Tour(ist)” - James Partaik, Luc Lévesque and Hernando Barragan 

“CANOPY: Rainforest Listening 2.0” - Leah Barclay and Toby Gifford 




Sunday July 10, 2016 09:00 - 21:00
Room 3.63 (Music Technology)

09:30

Sonic Environments Keynote Panel
Sonic Environments will open with a dynamic keynote panel featuring six international leaders in the field who will each present short provocations on the conference theme from diverse perspectives. This panel will conclude with a Q&A and form the foundation for discussions and collaborations throughout the conference. 

SABINE BREITSAMETER (GERMANY)
Dr Sabine Breitsameter is an experimental radio maker, curator and Professor of Sound and Media Culture at Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences. Her research focuses on electroacoustic art, media history and the culture of listening. From 2004–08 she was visiting professor of experimental sound design at the Berlin University of the Arts where she co-founded the Sound Studies master degree course. As an author, director and editor she focuses on media art, contemporary music and modern culture and has created many radio plays and documentaries, mainly for the German public broadcasters Deutschlandradio and ARD, but also for ORF/Austria, NPR/USA, and Radio Canada. As a scientific and artistic director she has curated numerous art projects, symposia and festivals, including Symposium on Listening (Kassel 1997, in parallel with documenta X), StadtStimmen (Wiesbaden 1999), trans_canada (ZKM Karlsruhe 2005), Radio_Copernicus – the German-Polish Artist Radio (Berlin–Warsaw–Wrocław, 2004–2006) and The Global Composition: Conference on Sound, Media and Ecology (Darmstadt 2012). In 2010, she published, translated into German and wrote the introduction to R. Murray Schafer’s The Tuning of the World, the seminal text in the field of acoustic ecology. Her current research focuses on 3D audio, its history and dramaturgical and design innovations.

SABINE FEISST (USA)
Dr Sabine Feisst is Professor of Musicology and Senior Sustainability Scholar at Arizona State University’s School of Music and Global Institute of Sustainability. Focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century music studies, she published the monographs Der Begriff ‘Improvisation’ in der neuen Musik (Studio Verlag, 1997) and Schoenberg’s New World: The American Years (Oxford University Press, 2011) which won the Society for American Music’s prestigious Lowens Award for the most outstanding book on American music in 2011 and was called “a pioneering work of revisionist scholarship.” In 2014 she was chosen as one of five ASU professors to receive the Defining Edge Research Award in the Humanities and Literature. Her research has been supported by German and American government grants and she has served on the National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship board. Author of over 80 articles in anthologies, journals and reference works and US editor of Contemporary Music Review, she is currently writing a monograph on music inspired by the American Southwest deserts, editing the Oxford Handbook of Ecomusicology, and is general editor with Denise Von Glahn for the Music, Nature, Place book series from Indiana University Press. With Garth Paine, she co-directs ASU’s Acoustic Ecology Lab which includes such research streams as the Listen(n) Project and EcoRift. 

STEPHAN MOORE (USA)
Stephan Moore is a composer, improviser, audio artist, sound designer, teacher, and curator based in Chicago. His creative work currently manifests as electronic studio compositions, solo and group improvisations, sound installation works, scores for collaborative performance pieces, and sound designs for unusual circumstances. Evidence, his long-standing project with Scott Smallwood, has performed widely and released several recordings over the past 15 years. He is the president of the American Society for Acoustic Ecology, and is a member of The Nerve Tank, a canary torsi, Composers Inside Electronics, and the Wingspace Theatrical Collective. He toured for several years as a musician with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, and has worked with artists as diverse as Pauline Oliveros, Anthony McCall, and Animal Collective. He is a lecturer in Sound Art and Sound Design in the Department of Radio, Television and Film at Northwestern University. 

ANDREW SKEOCH (AUSTRALIA)
Andrew Skeoch is a bioacoustic researcher, naturalist and Australia's best-known nature soundscape recordists. Together with his partner, photographer Sarah Koschak, he established the independent label Listening Earth in 1993 to publish authentic, natural soundscape recordings. This work has now taken him around the world, documenting the sounds of iconic landscapes and threatened ecosystems in remote locations in Asia, India, Africa and the Americas in search of some of our planet’s most beautiful and fascinating sounds. To date, they have published over 80 albums, and Listening Earth has grown to include the work of pre-eminent colleagues. Their CD albums 'A Morning in the Australian Bush' and 'Favourite Australian Birdsong' have each sold over 50,000 copies. Andrew has also contributed sounds to films such as 'Pirates of the Carribean', Disney's 2016 remake of 'The Jungle Book' and Peter Gabriel's soundtrack to 'Rabbit Proof Fence'. Andrew's current research focuses on acoustic ecology, ecoacoustics and the value of listening to the environment. 

VANESSA TOMLINSON (AUSTRALIA)
Australian percussionist Vanessa Tomlinson is active in the fields of solo percussion, contemporary chamber music, improvisation, installation and composition. She has performed at festivals around the world such as Wien Modern, London Jazz Festival, Green Umbrella Series LA, Bang-on-a-Can Marathon NY, The Adelaide Festival of Arts, and Shanghai Festival. Vanessa is co-founder and artistic director of Clocked Out, one of Australia’s most important and eclectic musical organisations, artistic director of percussion quartet Early Warning System and the percussionist for The Australian Art Orchestra. She is particularly well-known for her interpretations of the music of Pateras, Griswold and Globokar, her improvisational language that incorporates acoustic ecology and sonic investigations of found objects and her tireless advocacy for awareness of the plethora of high quality music-making happening in Australia. Over the years Vanessa has commissioned, inspired and premiered more than 100 works, worked alongside countless wonderful improvisers, an collaborated with visual artists, dancers, and actors in a variety of settings. She is currently Associate Professor in Music at Queensland Conservatorium, Griffith University. 

IAN WHALLEY (NEW ZEALAND)
Ian Whalley is an internationally recognised author, researcher and composer in the fields of electroacoustic music, computer music, and sonic art. His electroacoustic compositions have been published by CUP and MIT Press and included in international events such as ICMC, MUSICACOUSTICA, TIMESPACE, VCH, ACMA, 121212. Works explore the relationship between acoustic performance and  real-time computer music gestures and idioms. He has received awards and grants from the British Council (UK), the NZ/Japan Exchange Programme (NZ/Japan), Kunitachi Centre for Computer Music (Japan), ICMC2000 (Germany), Meiji University Visiting Fellow (Japan), Klangart '99 (Germany) and UNESCO (India). Ian's current research focuses on networked music/sound, interactive systems, intelligent agent applications in non-linear music, generative systems, real-time graphic scoring, and data sonification. His research work and invited workshops are extensively published in leading computer music and arts/technology proceedings (ICMC, ISEA, EMS, NIME, Cyber@rt) throughout Europe, North America, Japan and Australasia. Ian is Head of Electroacoustic Music Studios and Associate Professor of Music at the University of Waikato in New Zealand. 

Moderators
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)

Presenters
SB

Sabine Breitsameter

Professor for Sound and Media Culture, Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences
Sabine Breitsameter (Berlin/Darmstadt) researches and teaches since 2006 as Professor for Sound and Media Culture at Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences. As an expert in experimental audio media, she has worked as dramaturge, director, editor and artist within the German public radio system, and as a director of festivals, symposia and exhibitions. In 2002-2008, she co-founded the Master’s program in “Sound Studies” at the University... Read More →
avatar for Sabine Feisst

Sabine Feisst

Professor of Music, Arizona State University
Dr Sabine Feisst is Professor of Musicology and Senior Sustainability Scholar at Arizona State University’s School of Music and Global Institute of Sustainability. Focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century music studies, she published the monographs Der Begriff ‘Improvisation’ in der neuen Musik (Studio Verlag, 1997) and Schoenberg’s New World: The American Years (Oxford University Press, 2011) which won the Society for American... Read More →

Performers
avatar for Stephan Moore

Stephan Moore

Lecturer, Northwestern University


Sunday July 10, 2016 09:30 - 10:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

10:30

Sonic Environments Morning Tea and Coffee / Installations / Listening Room

The Sonic Environments program includes a diversity of installations and experiences happening continuously throughout the building. Please download PDF program below for further information on each work. 


Queensland Conservatorium Foyer 

“Aural Fabric: Greenwich” - Alessia Milo

“Reversed Masking” - Mauricio Iregui

 

Room 2.16 (Level 2) 

A’varitia - Silent Greed” - May Wing Joy Chang

 

Room 2.30 (Level 2) 

“Flight Variant” - Teresa Connors 

 

Room 2.26 (Level 2) 

“It is impossible to know about Earth.... so we must hear her voice in our own way” - Johann Diedrick

 

Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre  (Room 3.44, Level 3)  

“Delta Soundings” - Adam Molinski

“The Holy Well Suite” - Dallas Simpson

“Listening Earth” - Andrew Skeoch

“EcoRift Virtual Reality and The Listen(n) Project” - Garth Paine and Sabine Feisst  

“3D-Sound and VR-Audio Demo” - Sabine Breitsameter

“Vanuatu Women’s Water Music” - Sandy Sur and Tom Dick  

“Conservation VR Experiences” - QCRC Music Technology Research Focus Area Group  

“The Kaleidophone – a sonic collage of the Leweton Cultural Experience in Vanuatu” - Toby Gifford and Kate Genevieve

 

Sonic Environments Listening Room (Music Technology Area, Room 3.36) 

“Floating Sound” - Mari Ohno

“Nero ipogeo” - Roberto Zanata

“Les chants de la mer (Songs of the see)” - Gilles Fresnais

“1916” - Daria Baiocchi

“Apax” - Alexis Langevin-Tétrault

“usedlost” - Roger Alsop

“Inhabitated Places_Part III (Three Degrees of Inner Motion)” - Jones Margarucci

“Reverie of Solitude” - Kyle Vanderburg

“A Small Timequake // Of Shifts And Currents” - Cissi Tsang

“What you might have heard..’” - Nigel Frayne

“Cúige (Province)” - Cárthach Ó Nuanáin

 

Immersive Installations (Music Technology Area, IMERSD Live Room) 

“Fluctuant” - Mauricio Iregui and Toby Gifford 

“XIRMINJA NAHPY BERRY” - Pablo Sanz

 

Augmented Reality Soundwalks 

“Ambulation” - Tim Shaw (Sound Walk) 

“Tour(ist)” - James Partaik, Luc Lévesque and Hernando Barragan 

“CANOPY: Rainforest Listening 2.0” - Leah Barclay and Toby Gifford 

 



Sunday July 10, 2016 10:30 - 11:00
Conservatorium's Foyer Queensland Conservatorium

11:00

Sonic Environments Keynote Panel Q & A
Sonic Environments will open with a dynamic keynote panel featuring six international leaders in the field who will each present short provocations on the conference theme from diverse perspectives. This panel will conclude with a Q&A and form the foundation for discussions and collaborations throughout the conference. 

Moderators
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)

Presenters
SB

Sabine Breitsameter

Professor for Sound and Media Culture, Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences
Sabine Breitsameter (Berlin/Darmstadt) researches and teaches since 2006 as Professor for Sound and Media Culture at Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences. As an expert in experimental audio media, she has worked as dramaturge, director, editor and artist within the German public radio system, and as a director of festivals, symposia and exhibitions. In 2002-2008, she co-founded the Master’s program in “Sound Studies” at the University... Read More →
avatar for Sabine Feisst

Sabine Feisst

Professor of Music, Arizona State University
Dr Sabine Feisst is Professor of Musicology and Senior Sustainability Scholar at Arizona State University’s School of Music and Global Institute of Sustainability. Focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century music studies, she published the monographs Der Begriff ‘Improvisation’ in der neuen Musik (Studio Verlag, 1997) and Schoenberg’s New World: The American Years (Oxford University Press, 2011) which won the Society for American... Read More →

Performers
avatar for Stephan Moore

Stephan Moore

Lecturer, Northwestern University


Sunday July 10, 2016 11:00 - 12:00
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

12:30

Sonic Environments Lunch Time Concert
Echolocation Suite - Alice Bennett
Three short pieces for flute and micro-bats (world premiere).

This work uses data collected by Australian environmental scientist, Dr. Lindy Lumsden, in her research of native Australian micro bats. It uses data from bat-detecting devices: ultrasonic recording devices that recognize bat calls and transpose them down to the human hearing range. The data is analysed in the form of a spectrogram, and each species of bat is discerned by the shape and range of the calls. This piece uses the pitch and rhythm of bat calls as source material for the structure of each movement, and also uses the transposed calls throughout. The recordings are triggered at certain frequencies and dynamics of the flute via Max MSP, setting bats flying across the room (in 4 channels). The flute mimics different types of bat calls, triggering and reacting to the recordings and using its inherent flexibility to create a different voice in each register.

I. Victoria Circa 5.' There are 21 species of native bats in Victoria, all with unique calls above human hearing range. Like birds, these calls occur in different frequency levels so that different species of bat may co-exist without disturbing each other. A bat’s call bounces off the objects around it allowing it to ‘see’ at night, creating a beautiful cacophony that no one ever notices.

II. Melbourne Circa 5.' Did you think that bats only live in the bush? 17 of the 21 species of bats in Victoria can be found in metropolitan Melbourne, roosting in the hollows of our 100+-year-old trees. These fascinating creatures go largely unnoticed by all except the odd cat due to their size (most adult micro bats fit into a matchbox), speed, and auditory range (only a few species can be heard by humans, including the White-striped Freetail Bat). These bats are insectivorous and without them we’d be inundated with mosquitos and bugs.

III. Southern Bent-Wing Bat Circa 6.' Very little is known about this curious endangered species other than its secretive breeding place in a cave somewhere in South-West Victoria. These bats can be found all over Victoria, but unlike any other species of bat, they travel hundreds of miles to breed in one place. No one knows how the young bats know where to go, without flying in flocks like birds there’s no way for them to follow each other, so how do they know where to go? This is one of the questions that Dr. Lindy Lumsden hopes to answer in her research.

Along the Eaves - Benjamin O'Brien 
"along the eaves" is part of a series that focuses on my interest in translational procedures and machine listening. It takes its name from the following line in Franz Kafka’s “A Crossbreed [A Sport]” (1931, trans. 1933): “On the moonlight nights its favourite promenade is along the eaves.” To compose the work, I developed custom software written in the programming languages of C and SuperCollider. I used these programs in different ways to process and sequence my source materials, which, in this case, included audio recordings of water, babies, and string instruments. Like other works in the series, I am interested in fabricating sonic regions of coincidence, where my coordinated mix of carefully selected sounds suggests relationships between the sounds and the illusions they foster.

Rainwire - David Burraston
Rainwire encompasses the investigation of rainfall & its application as a medium for artistic, cultural & scientific exchange. The Rainwire project includes development of a prototype Acoustic Rain Gauge using suspended cables (long wire instruments), and subsequently expanded through various collaborations in a range of creative & environmental contexts. Rainwire is an experimental approach at technological appropriation of agricultural based objects for art and science, with particular emphasis on climate change issues and agriculture. This performance will present a live laptop mix of environmental sonification recordings from the newly built Rainwire prototype. Previous work on Rainwire has been conducted on shared instruments, this performance will be an opportunity to present the newly built dedicated Rainwire prototype in public for the first time in Australia. Long-wire instruments are made from spans of fencing wire across the open landscape. Rainwire developed from using contact mic recordings of rainfall ‘playing’ the long wire instruments for my music compositions. This enabled a proof of concept study to the extent that the audio recordings demonstrate a wide variety of temporal & spatial rain event complexity. This suggests that environmental sonification has great potential to measure rainfall accurately, & address recognized shortcomings of existing equipment & approaches in meteorology. Rain induced sounds with long wire instruments have a wide range of unique, audibly recognisable features. All of these sonic features exhibit dynamic volume & tonal characteristics, depending on the rain type & environmental conditions. Aside from the vast array of creative possibilities, the high spatial, temporal, volume & tonal resolution could provide significant advancement to knowledge of rainfall event profiles, intensity & microstructure. The challenge lies in identifying distinctive sound patterns & relating them to particular types of rainfall events. Rainwire is beyond simple sonification of data, it embeds technology & data collection within cultural contexts. With rainfall as catalyst to draw inspiration from, artists, scientists & cultural groups are key to informing science & incite new creative modalities. 

Elephant Talk - Vicki Hallett
The Elephant Listening Project from Cornell University is the basis of Elephant Talk/Elephant Listening Project music performances. They present not only logistical difficulties but musical difficulties. It was 2-3 years of attempting to confirm the possibility of the project with Cornell University. The researchers and contacts of course, were deep in Africa recording the sounds for their research. Threats of poaching are a reality and in one instance, although the researcher reached safety, the elephants weren't so lucky. Cornell University use a variety of technological platforms for their research both recording and processing of these recordings. The music created also uses a variety of technological and compositional methods to both utilise the sounds and to create something that is inspiring, innovative and become a whole listening experience. Through using different format types of sounds, for example: infrasonic sampled so that humans can hear them as well as regular files, the aim is to create relationships between the natural environment of the forest elephants, the other recorded acoustic occurrences while incorporating various instruments to create a conversation between the sonic environment, performer and listener.

NOISA Étude 2 - Juan Carlos Vasquez and Koray Tahiroğlu
"NOISA Étude 2" is a second set of performance instructions created to showcase compelling, evolving and complex soundscapes only possible when operating the NOISA instruments, integrating the system’s autonomous responses as part of a musical piece. The multi-layered sound interaction design is based on radical transformations of acoustic instruments performing works from the classical music repertoire. This second "étude" is based entirely on interaction with spectrum-complementary Phase Vocoders. The system is fed with variations of a fixed musical motif, encouraging the system to recognise elements of the motive and create its own set of different versions emulating a human musical compositional process. Also, the Myo Armband is used in a creative way as an independent element for dynamic control, using raw data extracted from the muscles’ tension. 

Hyvät matkustajat - James Andean 
Hyvat matkustajat (2014) (Finnish for 'Dear Travellers', but also for 'The Good Travellers') began life as a "sonic postcard from Finland", using soundscape field recordings from around the country. This turned out to be only the first stop on its journey, however. The original material was later further developed as material for sonic exploration and spectral transformations, with the external spaces of the original version taking a sharp digital turn inwards, to chart internal spectral landscapes, together with the soundmarks and soundscapes of its first incarnation. Everything in Hyvat matkustajat is made from the original field recordings which first gave birth to the piece.

Presenters
avatar for Benjamin O'Brien

Benjamin O'Brien

Laboratoire Musique et Informatique de Marseille
American composer, researcher, and performer living in Marseille, France.


Sunday July 10, 2016 12:30 - 13:45
Basil Jones Orchestral Hall 1.82 Queensland Conservatorium

14:00

Sonic Environments Papers (stream A)

Teresa Connors: The University of Waikato Conservatorium of Music New Zealand

 THE AESTHETICS OF CAUSALITY

This article presents some of the contextual frameworks that have located the author’s development into a crea- tive research practice calls Ecological Performativity. This practice has evolved from a number of non-linear audiovisual works that are intrinsically linked to geographic and everyday phenomena. These works explore the relationship of environment, material, and process, and are derived from an intensive data gathering procedure and immersion within the respective environments. The project is situated in an ecological discourse that seeks to explore conditions and methods of for co-compositional processes between human and nonhuman bodies. This article negotiates the relational interplay between first person (my) experience in creative practice with that of the interdisciplinary influences that accompany it. These include a number of recent critical, theoretical, and philosophical discourses occurring in the humanities and social sciences generally referred to as The Nonhuman Turn. It is out of this relational interplay that the notion of Ecological Performativity has evolved.

Jesse Budel: Elder Conservatorium of Music, Faculty of Arts, The University of Adelaide

CREATIVE RESPONSES TO SOUNDSCAPE ECOLOGY: INNOVATIVE FRAMEWORKS AND CASE STUDY

Soundscape ecology is becoming a pioneering discipline in contemporary ecological research, investigating the relationships between landscape and soundscape (or topographic and acoustic patterns). In recent years, the discipline has enjoyed increasing international attention as a prominent field of research in contemporary and conferences. The breadth and scope of this field offers many possibilities for innovative creative applications. Whilst there is already a strong body of artistic work with the humanities-oriented acoustic ecology movement and other ecoacoustic compositional approaches, the comprehensive frameworks and methodologies of soundscape ecology have thus far not been specifically explored in a creative context. This paper explores a creative process-in-development that adapts these principles of soundscape ecology, and presents a compositional case study in response to Mobilong Swamp (near Murray Bridge, South Australia), and its related soundscape and ecosystem.

Joe Cantrell: UCSD Department of Music

 PAYING IT FORWARD: SOUND ART STRATEGIES FOR THE POST-ANTHROPOCENE

In the 1980s, geographer Eugene F. Stoermer coined a term that has achieved pronounced attention in the 21st century. Known as the Anthropocene, the conception refers to a geological period of time from the late 19th century to the present, in which the most profound force affecting change on the earth is the collective, often unconscious action of humanity (Crutzen, 17).

In order for sound art to sustain meaning and functionality across epochs, new conceptions of time and materiality and their relationship to sound must be examined.

In this text, I will use the conceit of the Anthropocene to provide a framework for envisioning and designing sound art that is informed by the prospect of the end of an era in which human activity is identified as being the primary agent of change on Earth. In doing so, I will outline strategies that can be put into place to evoke, for inhabitants of the far future, a very personal and aural sense of the contemporary moment.


Moderators
Presenters
JB

Jesse Budel

PhD Candidate, Elder Conservatorium Of Music
avatar for Joe Cantrell

Joe Cantrell

UC San Diego | CA | USA
avatar for Teresa Connors

Teresa Connors

Waikato University
Teresa Connors is active as an acoustic/electroacoustic composer, opera singer, film scorer, and multimedia installation artist. She is currently completing a practice- based PhD at Waikato University that includes developing new techniques and methodologies for multimedia collaborations. Teresa holds a Master of Music degree (1st class honours) in composition from Waikato University and studied both composition and opera singing at Dalhousie... Read More →


Sunday July 10, 2016 14:00 - 15:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

14:00

Sonic Environments Papers (stream B)

Roger Alsop: Victorian College of the Arts and Melbourne Conservatorium of Music Production

USEDLOST: CREATING A MULTI-SPATIAL AUDIOWORK FROM VIRTUAL LOCATIONS

usedlost was created for the 2015 Prague Quadrennial for the SoundKitchen call for works “compiled or composed using field (location) recordings made during Prague Quadrennial 2015 [and] linked to the main theme of PQ ’15: “SharedSpace: Music Weather Politics”. It explores linking new and old information distribution technologies, to create a sense of location that can be experienced and possibly understood through virtual representations of varying histories and languages.

An 8-channel audio system was used for sound dispersal in the New Stage of the National Theatre in Prague, and a max patch was designed for creating and recording the 22’ work


Stuart James: Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts Edith Cowan University

 A CLASSIFICATION OF MULTI-POINT SPECTRAL SOUND SHAPES

Previous research by the author has involved the investigation of sound shapes produced by the multi- point spatial diffusion of independent spectral bands. Fundamentally two implementations emerged through this research: one that primarily dealt with only the diffusion of spectra (i.e. spectral spatialisation) and another further extension of this approach that accounted for unique frequency-space distributions unfolding through time (i.e. timbre spatialisation implemented in the frequency domain). Through the process of exploring these possible sound shapes, a range of multi-point distributions emerged making it possible to form a categorical set of distinct multi-point distributions. The classifications were informed by the writings of Gary Kendall, Francis Rumsey, Robert Normandeau, Ewan Stefani, and Karen Lauke on spatiality, writings by Albert Bregman on auditory scene analysis (ASA), writings on directionality and immersion within the field of psychoacoustics, writings by Denis Smalley on spectromorphology, spatiomorphology, spatial texture, contiguous space, and non-contiguous space (i.e. zones), writings by Gary Kendall on spectral correlation and decorrelation, and writings by Trevor Wishart on spatial motion.


Mr Cornelis Fuhler: Independent Artist

SPLINTER AT MUNGO: THE ART OF COMMUNICATION

In 2015, the Splinter Orchestra received an invitation to be part of Tectonics Adelaide in March 20161. Rather than fly directly to Adelaide, 21 members of the Sydney based orchestra decided to travel via land, rehearse and play on the way, and record for a number of days in Mungo National Park, NSW. This paper describes the working methods of the orchestra, their members’ conceptual pieces, and its approach to site specific elements and the environment during this epic week.



Moderators
avatar for Toby Gifford

Toby Gifford

General Chair, NIME 2016

Presenters
RA

Roger Alsop

University of Melbourne |Melbourne|Victoria|Australia
avatar for Cornelis Fuhler

Cornelis Fuhler

Since the mid 1980s Cor Fuhler (1964) is a Dutch/Australian active composer, multi instrumentalist, improviser, instrument builder, artist and inventor whose practice is an interdisciplinary one crossing into installation, dance, puppetry, comic strip, music theatre and site-specific performance. | His work has taken him on numerous tours around Europe, Canada, the USA, Indonesia, Japan, Brazil, Australia and New Zealand, and his recordings are... Read More →
SJ

Stuart James

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia


Sunday July 10, 2016 14:00 - 15:30
Conservatorium Room 2.14

16:00

Sonic Environments Papers 2 (stream B)

Dr. Johannes Mulder: School of Arts Murdoch University, Perth,
Dr. Juan Parra Cancino: Orpheus Research Centre in Music [ORCiM] Ghent

ON SOLO – A PROGRESS REPORT

This paper reports on an ongoing research project around Karlheinz Stockhausen's historical work Solo (Solo, für Melodie-Instrument mit Rückkopplung 1965-6).1 Together with Dr. Juan Parra Cancino from ORCIM Ghent, we are teasing out the consequences of the (nowadays common) software replacement of the elaborate tape delay system that was used at the time of the work’s inception. Many of the technical elements (e.g. in and output levels, delay feedback level, output levels) were operated as prescribed by the score by no less than three technicians. These roles have now been integrated into software patches (e.g. MaxMsp or PD (Sluchin 2000)) but also an app for i-Phone and pad (Petrolati 2016). Software approaches integrate and automate the score to different levels, with one version going as far as integrating the soloist’s sound source into the digital domain (Esler 2006).

Even thought this work’s score is strongly prescriptive, like many of the composer works, performances and recordings of Solo have been augmented in different ways, most notably the addition of a layer of electronic music in the work’s first recording with trombonist Vinko Globokar (from 1969). Another freedom provided in the score for this work is the choice of different timbral modes (e.g. a choice of mutes in the case of brass players).

Where the proto-affordance of analogue tape is reproducibility, the proto-affordance of a computer simulating a tape system is much richer, with its ability to compute and facilitate interaction. At the same time, a computer these days implies a network, commonly the Internet. To simply reduce the computer to a simulator of older technologies and not exploring what digital technology affords seems to go against the grain of this influential work, and of electronic music performance.

In our research project we attempt to pull apart the distinct layers of input (soloist), delay system (software), level of control and loudspeaker system output (usually four channels). We have produced some concerts with these four layers performed either in the same venue, or in different venues (and even countries).


Cissi Tsang: Edith Cowan University WAAPA

HEXADECIMAL COMPOSITIONS – USING HEX DATA TO SONIFY IMAGES OF THE FOUND ENVIRONMENT

There have been numerous efforts to explore the relationship between the visual and aural, in particular in relation to converting one medium into another. The interchange between music and images can create powerful, evocative, multi-sensory and immersive narratives for both the audience and the artist. One method of relating the aural and visual is through data composition, where data from the visual is used to create the aural. This paper will discuss the usage of hexadecimal data in relation to the artist's own practice and experiments in sonifying the found environment. This practice combines music created from converting field footage and photographs into hexadecimal data and music visualisation, to offer multiple perspectives of a specific scene. The resultant works from this process are audio-visual pieces where both the aural and visual are intertwined. This paper will conclude with some examples of work.


Mari Ohno
FLOATING SOUND: ARTIST TALK 

We release extremely subtle sounds from inside our bodies which are hard to perceive. Although the sound is made by the body, it cannot be heard because of the limited audible range that a human being can hear. 
This work is a composition using the sound of the composer’s bloodstream as a sound source. All the sounds were created from the sounds of the bloodstream recorded mainly in an anechoic chamber. 
The purpose of this work is to deconstruct and reconstruct the components of personal biological information via computing. These sounds were composed to express another reality beyond the boundary of the animate / inanimate. 

 

Moderators
avatar for Cat Hope

Cat Hope

Associate Dean (Research), Edith Cowan Univeristy
digital graphic notation - low frequency sound - experimental music performance - digital archives for music and software - artistic research - artists in the academy -

Presenters
avatar for Johannes Mulder

Johannes Mulder

Lecturer in Sound, Murdoch University
avatar for Mari Ohno

Mari Ohno

Goldsmiths, University of London
Japanese sound artist


Sunday July 10, 2016 16:00 - 17:30
Conservatorium Room 2.14

16:00

Sonic Environments Papers 2 (stream A)

Dr. Garth Paine: Arts Media and Engineering Arizona State University

LISTENING FOR PRESENCE

The question of sound as experience is critical to discussions about environmental listening. I have come to think of sound as a viscous material, a vibrating energy field that has texture and density and a physicality that is unlike most other media.
I arrived at this view through a combination of several experiences and practices. The first being a process of duration environmental listening and the second, an invitation to be part of an Australian indigenous dreaming ceremony at Bundanon in NSW. These experiences brought me to a point of knowing that everything is part of an N dimensional vector field - where by energy fields can be attracted together to form a presence in the world. I came to think of sound in these terms. Sources move, perhaps in relation to each other and in relation also to environmental forces, all making up a manifold and complex morphology, a rich and largely invisible to me interconnectedness.
This interconnectedness is an experience I have sought increasingly deeply through durational listening where I ask myself, "what does it mean to be truly present", is it possible to continuously deepen that sense of presence through repeated practice?

Sabine Feisst: Arizona State University School of Music

LISTENING TO DESERTS IN THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST: GARTH PAINE’S EXPLORATIONS OF SONIC PLACEMAKING

Thanks to their fierce nature and potential for metaphor, deserts have long fascinated musicians. Edgard Varèse, Olivier Messiaen, Luc Ferrari and Peter Sculthorpe created works inspired by deserts around the world, but they had only a tenuous connection with these places. In contrast, David Dunn, Richard Lerman, Maggi Payne and Garth Paine have strongly identified with deserts and paid tribute to them in numerous works, compelling examples of sensitive engagement with these places. This paper centers on Australian-born composer and sound artist Paine. I will analyze and contextualize his large-scale interdisciplinary and collaborative Listen(n) Project, his acousmatic work Becoming Desert (2014) and live-electronic flute piece Forest (2015) which have been inspired by deserts in the American Southwest and draw on field recordings made with ambisonic recording technology. I will explain how they reflect Paine’s environmental philosophies and concepts of sonic placemaking in the context of composition, virtual reality experiences, community art and citizen science projects.

Ons Barnat: Université Laval, Québec, Canada

Virtual Reality, Spatial Sound and the Future of Ethnomusicology

Since SXSW (South by Southwest in Austin, Texas) 2014’s edition and the presentation of "Strangers with Patrick Watson", produced by Felix & Paul Studios, cinematic films in 3D and 360° are about to become a major reality for the music industry. With the commercialization of virtual reality head-mounted displays (Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR, HTC Vive...), demand for creative content for this new way of listening to music performances opens Pandora's box for every music maker – and also for any ethnographer.

By putting the user at the center of an immersive experience, VR technology offers new ways to think about the relationship between the artists and their audiences. From the research side, how this paradigmatic shift could influence the way we do music ethnography? What happens with the researcher’s position? What about the musicians? How to measure the artists’ choices in the data analysis? How to manage the marketing of such content?

After an overview of some audio recordings techniques used in virtual reality, this communication will present our first ethnomusicological data collected with a 360° audio-visual recording device. This will allow us to estimate the role of sound recording in the "restitution" in VR. From a presentation of our postdoctoral research, the Music Legacy Project (www.musiclegacyproject.com, developed in partnership with the audio-visual post-production company La Hacienda Creative, based in Montreal and Toronto, Canada) – this paper will also address some of the methodological, ethical and epistemological issues raised by the use of such a experimental device.


Jordan Lacey - Artist Talk and Book Launch: SONIC RUPTURE
(with special guest Stephan Moore)

Dr Jordan Lacey is a vice-chancellor’s postdoctoral fellow in the School of Architecture & Design, RMIT University. He is a practising sound-artist and musician, whose research is focussed on urban sound design. His practice might be considered post-acoustic ecology, insofar as he seeks to apply acoustic ecology practices to noisy urban environments. His recently released book (Bloomsbury) and coming paper (Organised Sound) both emphasize what is for Lacey the most important aspect of his own practice: the possibility of creating in everyday life encounters that encourage imaginative, poetic and even mythic responses from the public. 

Lacey has created multiple sound installations in Melbourne. In each of these installations he applies a methodology he calls noise transformation. Noise, considered a homogenous material, is ruptured, not by introducing new sounds, but by recreating our impressions of what already exists. As such we are invited to engage with the world not as it is, but as what it could be. Lacey is presently working with Transurban to investigate the possibilities of noise transformation approaches in motorway parklands; thus applying his practice to corporately managed lands. 

His recently released book, published with Bloomsbury, titled ‘Sonic Rupture: a practice-led approach to urban soundscape design’ is an invitation to rethink the original tenets of acoustic ecology by considering a new relationship with the noises of global cities. Rather than remonstrating against the proliferation of noise, Lacey considers noises as cultural and political expressions that can be redesigned to afford new everyday experiences. 

Lacey completed an international field trip at the end of 2015 investigating eleven permanent American and European sound art installations that have become features of the urban landscape. His paper ‘Sonic Placemaking: ten attributes and three approaches for the creation of enduring sound art installations’, which describes the trip, will be published in the coming edition of the international journal Organised Sound. The paper uses artist interviews, sound recordings and on-site observations to suggest a number of attributes that can be discerned in the visited installations. 

His work also extends into collaborations with Australian Indigenous people including the Yolngu, Barkindji and Wurundjeri, with who he has produced a number of cross-cultural sound works. In these works Lacey seeks to be affected by mythic expression, by combining sounds with the stories he encounters. It is here that his practice overlaps with Acoustic Ecologists’ search for the mythic ‘ur-sound’; but rather than emphasizing its loss, he instead calls for a sonic activism that will rediscover such imaginative possibilities within the urban. 
 

Moderators
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)

Presenters
avatar for Sabine Feisst

Sabine Feisst

Professor of Music, Arizona State University
Dr Sabine Feisst is Professor of Musicology and Senior Sustainability Scholar at Arizona State University’s School of Music and Global Institute of Sustainability. Focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century music studies, she published the monographs Der Begriff ‘Improvisation’ in der neuen Musik (Studio Verlag, 1997) and Schoenberg’s New World: The American Years (Oxford University Press, 2011) which won the Society for American... Read More →
avatar for Garth Paine

Garth Paine

Associate Professor in Digital Sound and Interactive Media, Arizona State University|Tempe|Arizona|USA
Garth is particularly fascinated with sound as an experiential medium, both in musical performance and as an exhibitable object. This passion has led to several interactive responsive environments where the inhabitant generates the sonic landscape through their presence and behaviour. Garth has composed several music scores for dance generated through video tracking of the choreography, and more recently using Bio-Sensing on the dancers body. His... Read More →

Performers
avatar for Stephan Moore

Stephan Moore

Lecturer, Northwestern University


Sunday July 10, 2016 16:00 - 18:00
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

19:30

Sonic Environments Evening Concert
Coral Bells Movt.2 2016 -  Brigid Burke
Coral Bells explores the diverse overtone, microtone sounds and origins of the Federation Hand Bells and Bass clarinet into the visual with discrete sounds of the ecosystems of coral from Fitzroy Island Northern Australia. This creation brings a new life to the Federation Hand Bells providing deepening connections with the Australian landscape. It is the conversation of between the audio and dead coral from that accentuates the audio-visual reflecting both the translucent Federation Bell sounds, Bass clarinet, glass and dead coral. The acoustic resonators vibrates with the coral and are recreated into visuals of moving glass objects. These sounds transform into acousmatic sounds. The colors and texture within the visuals are layered white/grey, sepia, hints of pastel colours, burnt reds, yellows and gold images that are layered to create a thick timbral texture to form the video voice. The sounds of subtle high pitched Bells and gritty sand sounds with the Bass clarinet periodically joining the drones with discordant multiphonics and flourishes of notes dominate throughout. Subsequent acoustic and visual motifs capture and emerge sonically/visually creating timbre layers of the interpreted coral and glass reflections.

On Solo - Johannes Mulder
The performance is part of the ongoing research project into Karlheinz Stockhausen’s historic work Solo (Solo, für Melodie-Instrument mit Rückkopplung 1965-6). Together with my colleague Dr. Juan Parra Cancino from ORCIM Ghent we are teasing out the consequences of the (now common) software replacement of the elaborate tape delay system that was used in the time of the work’s inception.

Shelter - Sam Gillies
bass flute - Cat Hope 
bass clarinet - Lindsay Vickery
viola - Aaron Wyatt 

Working almost exclusively at a very soft volume, Shelter inverts the relationships between the source sound material and it’s experience in the real world, placing very large sounds (sourced from field recordings) at the threshold of audibility while audio artifacts are brought to the forefront of our focus to act as recognisable musical material. By utilising a soft dynamic, all audience members are able to hear each channel more equally, regardless of their position in the performance space. This new version for bass clarinet, electric guitar, and electronics expands the original electronic composition into something more lively and environmentally focused. The compositional intentions of the original Shelter remain at play here - this version still seeks to address the assumptions of multichannel listening, while affecting an environment of sound in preference to an experience of sound. However, this electroacoustic version adds a little bit of much needed chaos, allowing performers to interact and manipulate this sonic environment.

Ground Interference - The Listen(n) Project - Leah Barclay 
Ground Interference draws on short recordings from each location I visited in spring 2014 with a particular focus on Joshua Tree National Park, Jornada Biosphere Reserve, Mojave Desert, and Death Valley National Park. These fragile desert environments are inhabited by thousands of species all part of a delicate ecosystem that is in a state of flux induced by changing climates. The transfixing acoustic ecologies of the southwest deserts demand a stillness that encourages a deeper environmental awareness and engagement. In many instances during our field trip we struggled to find locations without human interference. The distant hum of highway traffic and relentless airplanes under the flight path from LAX were expected, yet we also encountered unexpected sounds interfering with the acoustic ecologies of the land. These range from an obscure reverberating vending machine in Death Valley National Park to rattling power lines in the Jornada Biosphere Reserve that were so loud I could feel the vibrations through my feet.

Becoming Desert - The Listen(n) Project - Garth Paine 
Becoming Desert draws on the experience of sitting or lying down silent in the desert for several hours at a time to make sound recordings. The field recordings I made in four deserts of the American Southwest are the basis of this work. When listening to the desert sounds through headphones at the time of recording, one is aware of a kind of hyper-real sonic environment. The amplified soundfield in the headphones is surreal in its presence and accuracy and multiplies my direct experience of listening many times.

Nature Forms II [2016] for flute, clarinet, viola, percussion, hybrid field recording and electronics - Lindsay Vickery

bass flute - Cat Hope
clarinet - Lindsay Vickery
viola - Aaron Wyatt
percussion - Vanessa Tomlinson

Nature Forms II is an eco-structuralist work, maintaining what Opie and Brown term the “primary rules” of “environmentally-based musical composition”: that “structures must be derived from natural sound sources” and that “structural data must remain in series”. Nature Forms II explores the possibility of recursive re-interrogation of a field recording through visualization and resonification/resynthesis via machine and performative means. The source field recording is contrasted with artificially generated versions created with additive, subtractive and ring modulation resynthesis. Interaction between the live performers and the electronic components are explores through “spectral freezing” of components of the field recording to create spectrally derived chords from features of the recording bird sounds and a rusty gate which are then transcribed into notation for the instrumentalists and temporal manipulation of the recording to allow complex bird calls to be emulated in a human time-scale.

Basaur - Stephan Moore
Basaur is a structured improvisation for software, microphones, and objects, performed through a multichannel sound system. Using simple, readymade household devices as the primary sound source, Basaur unfolds as a guided exploration of the small mechanical drones and noises that occupy the edges of our quotidian sonic awareness. Using both pre-recorded and live-performed sound sources, textures are layered and connected, building to a richly detailed environment of active sounds -- background becomes foreground, and the everyday annoyances of modern convenience take on a full-throated presence that is by turns lyrical and menacing.

Presenters
avatar for Brigid Burke

Brigid Burke

Freelance Artist
Brigid is an Australian composer, performance artist, clarinet soloist, visual artist, video artist and educator whose creative practice explores the use of acoustic sound and technology to enable media performances and installations that are rich in aural and visual nuances. Her work is widely presented in concerts, festivals, and radio broadcasts throughout Australia, Asia, Europe and the USA. | Recently she has been a recipient of an... Read More →
avatar for Johannes Mulder

Johannes Mulder

Lecturer in Sound, Murdoch University

Performers
avatar for Cat Hope

Cat Hope

Associate Dean (Research), Edith Cowan Univeristy
digital graphic notation - low frequency sound - experimental music performance - digital archives for music and software - artistic research - artists in the academy -
avatar for Garth Paine

Garth Paine

Associate Professor in Digital Sound and Interactive Media, Arizona State University|Tempe|Arizona|USA
Garth is particularly fascinated with sound as an experiential medium, both in musical performance and as an exhibitable object. This passion has led to several interactive responsive environments where the inhabitant generates the sonic landscape through their presence and behaviour. Garth has composed several music scores for dance generated through video tracking of the choreography, and more recently using Bio-Sensing on the dancers body. His... Read More →
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
LV

Lindsay Vickery

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia
avatar for Stephan Moore

Stephan Moore

Lecturer, Northwestern University


Sunday July 10, 2016 19:30 - 22:00
Basil Jones Orchestral Hall 1.82 Queensland Conservatorium
 
Monday, July 11
 

09:00

Sonic Environments Papers 3 (stream A)

Jill Scott: Professor for Art and Science, Zurich University of the Arts, Switzerland (ZHdK)

AURALROOTS: Cross-modal Interaction and Learning

AURALROOTS is a media sculpture that combines viewer interaction with inspirations from tactile and aural sensory perception. The sculptural form is based on the functions and forms of the stereocilia, tiny hair cells on our auditory nerves of the inner ear in the cochlea. The content of AURALROOTS is about how we learn through sounds from being embodied in different environments: a) as a growing embryo in the womb, b) as a daughter listening to her mother and finally c) as a female artist communicating with auditory scientists.


Andrew Skeoch
: Listening Earth

WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM LISTENING TO NATURE?

Natural soundscapes provide a wealth of information, both to the casual listener and the research scientist. This ranges from aesthetic pleasure, to identification of species repertoire and behaviour, and measures of ecosystem health.

When we consider repertoires in an evolutionary context, we can understand sonic strategies as not only shaping behaviours and survival adaption, but being fundamental to speciation itself. This has been documented in certain insects, and can be speculated upon in higher animals.

This leads to an enquiry into the possible role of sonic communication in hominin development, and the suggestion that rhythmically synchronised communication (music) may be viewed as a biological rather than cultural phenomenon, unique to humans, of great antiquity, the result of which has been a gradual development of the higher brain functioning and eusociality distinctive to the hominin lineage.

While sound and acoustic communication may have shaped us, we are changing the natural soundworld at the very moment we are beginning to study and appreciate its richness. Natural sonic environments are coming to be seen as in need of preservation, and healthy soundscapes important for our wellbeing too.

Listening has been described as the universal sense. If music is culturally important as more than simply entertainment, personal taste or product, then it needs to address the challenges of our time; to help us find our human place in the natural world.


Abby Aresty
: Grinnell College Department of Music

Of Earth and Sun: Generative Soundscape Composition and Biophilic Design

This project is part of its Biophilia Enhanced Through Art (BETA) initiative, which uses art to remind people about nature’s beauty and the connections between humans and the natural world. Of Earth and Sun is a dynamic sound installation that evolves throughout the day and with the seasons. The systems at the CSL respond to environmental input in order to reduce its ecological footprint. Similarly, Of Earth and Sun uses data from the CSL’s on-site weather station to dynamically control the sounds and processes that will create the installation. Sounds and soundscapes gathered from throughout the Pittsburgh region are stored in a local database, processed, and played back through transducers placed on windows throughout the CSL’s atrium.

I am installing the fourth and final iteration of this project in the late summer and early fall of 2016. In this paper, I describe the project goals, processes, and outcomes of the various project iterations. I also examine listener experience and propose models for enhancing listener engagement in soundscape composition using diverse models of community engagement and user interface design.

Despite well-documented benefits
communities and individuals with easy access and direct exposure to nature, many individuals spend a majority of their working hours indoors. The field of sustainable design has tackled this issue through biophilic design, which strives to elicit a positive, valued experience of nature in the human built environment. But while biophilic design principles are increasingly employed within the visual domain, auditory applications of these principles are underutilized and underexplored. I examine sonic approaches to biophilic design in my generative soundscape installation, Of Earth and Sun. In 2013, the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Pittsburgh, PA, commissioned Of Earth and Sun, a permanent sound installation for the public atrium of the Center for Sustainable Landscapes (CSL).


 

Moderators
avatar for Sabine Feisst

Sabine Feisst

Professor of Music, Arizona State University
Dr Sabine Feisst is Professor of Musicology and Senior Sustainability Scholar at Arizona State University’s School of Music and Global Institute of Sustainability. Focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century music studies, she published the monographs Der Begriff ‘Improvisation’ in der neuen Musik (Studio Verlag, 1997) and Schoenberg’s New World: The American Years (Oxford University Press, 2011) which won the Society for American... Read More →

Presenters
AA

Abby Aresty

Postdoctoral Fellow in electronic music and sound studies, Grinnell College


Monday July 11, 2016 09:00 - 10:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

09:00

Sonic Environments Papers 3 (stream B)
Sandy Sur and Tom Dick

Sonic Environment in Vanuatu: Exploring Water Music

Sandy Sur’s research focuses around the Water Music of Vanuatu and its connection to the environment. Water connects everything on earth and is essential for survival. At a time when the world is facing so many environmental challenges it is more important than ever before to deeply understand the role of water in our life. Understanding the sound and rhythm of Vanuatu Water Music allows us to explore the environment in new ways and develop a deeper understanding of the role sound plays in the environment. The Water Music of Vanuatu is site-specific and deeply inspired by the surrounding environment. This inspiring tradition is now evolving in response to rapidly changing climates that are affecting island communities. 

Sandy is one of the only people in the world holding the knowledge to lead research on water music and over the last decade he has directed a wide spectrum of research projects designed to bring water music to the world. Sandy’s research showcases this tradition as a way for understanding the environment at a time when we urgently need to listen to nature. His research is realised as live performances, films, recordings and web based media designed as tools for reaching the world. 

Sandy Sur is the Manager of the Leweton Cultural group. While the water music of Vanuatu is a once-in-a-lifetime performance that needs to be seen (and heard) to be believed – the Leweton Cultural group deliver a range of customary artisanal performances and workshops including dances, weaving, carving, mixed-media/found objects, environmental art, and instrument-making. Sandy coordinates residencies for the group at international festivals and events with deep connections to people of place. The Leweton Cultural Group has stunned audiences at World Expo 2008 in Zaragova, several European Union diplomatic functions, the Rainforest World Music Festival in Borneo, the Bellingen Global Carnival, Queensland Music Festival, and the Floating Land Festival in Australia and the Lukaotem Gud Santo Festival in Vanuatu. Sandy is a ranked man and leader from Merelava in Vanuatu. A skilled carver, weaver, craftsman, and curator Sandy is adept at using elements of the natural world as well as found objects and ubiquitous technical items such as wire, rope, etc to create functional and beautiful objects. This research paper explores the sonic environments of Vanuatu and the role of Water Music. 

Ian Stevenson: School of Humanities and Communication Arts Western Sydney University

SOUNDSCAPE ANALYSIS FOR EFFECTIVE SOUND DESIGN IN COMMERCIAL ENVIRONMENTS

This paper reviews analytical literature concerned with retail and other commercial environments for the purposes of identifying effective sound design for ambient media including digital signage. The paper details the background to a proposed design project for the audio augmentation of digital signage in student services facilities on a university campus. In the paper, the term soundscape is used as a conceptual tool to explore the various dimensions of the experience of the acoustic environment that may be manipulated or accounted for in such a design.

Lindsay Vickery: Edith Cowan University School of Music,
Michael Terren: Edith Cowan University School of Music
Sam Gillies: Independent Artist
Josten Myburgh: Independent Artist

BETWEEN THE REAL AND THE IMAGINARY: ECOSTRUCTURAL APPROACHES TO COMPOSING WITH FIELD RECORDINGS AND ACOUSTIC INSTRUMENTS

This paper discusses recent works incorporating field recordings and acoustic instruments by four Western Australian composers: Sam Gillies, Josten Myburgh, Michael Terren and Lindsay Vickery. In particular, the paper investigates their approaches to issues and techniques of spectral analysis, sonification, coordination of live and prerecorded elements, transcription, resynthesis, transformation and ecostructural considerations. The discussion is framed by an examination of the evolution of the practice of combining field recordings and acoustic instruments as a genre in the context of ideological and technological advancements and impediments. The works are placed in the framework of emerging digital technologies deployed in similar work by James O'Callaghan, Aaron Einbond, Joanna Bailie and Chaz Underriner. 


Moderators
LV

Lindsay Vickery

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia

Presenters
avatar for Sandy Sur

Sandy Sur

Founder/Manager, Leweton Cultural Experience
“I believe that it is important for people to understand the sacred nature of water and this is one of the major reasons that I have worked hard to revive the use of magical Water Music in Vanuatu. | I see three things that connect us on earth. There is mother earth, our natural mother and water. Without these three things, nothing would exist. | The Vanuatu Women’s Water Music ceremony is an amazing display of sounds, rhythms and... Read More →


Monday July 11, 2016 09:00 - 10:30
Conservatorium Room 2.14

09:00

Sonic Environments Listening Room and Installations

The Sonic Environments program includes a diversity of installations and experiences happening continuously throughout the building. Please download PDF program below for further information on each work. 


Queensland Conservatorium Foyer 

“Aural Fabric: Greenwich” - Alessia Milo

“Reversed Masking” - Mauricio Iregui

 

Room 2.16 (Level 2) 

A’varitia - Silent Greed” - May Wing Joy Chang

 

Room 2.30 (Level 2) 

“Flight Variant” - Teresa Connors 

 

Room 2.26 (Level 2) 

“It is impossible to know about Earth.... so we must hear her voice in our own way” - Johann Diedrick

 

Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre  (Room 3.44, Level 3)  

“Delta Soundings” - Adam Molinski

“The Holy Well Suite” - Dallas Simpson

“Listening Earth” - Andrew Skeoch

“EcoRift Virtual Reality and The Listen(n) Project” - Garth Paine and Sabine Feisst  

“3D-Sound and VR-Audio Demo” - Sabine Breitsameter

“Vanuatu Women’s Water Music” - Sandy Sur and Tom Dick  

“Conservation VR Experiences” - QCRC Music Technology Research Focus Area Group  

“The Kaleidophone – a sonic collage of the Leweton Cultural Experience in Vanuatu” - Toby Gifford and Kate Genevieve

 

Sonic Environments Listening Room (Music Technology Area, Room 3.36) 

“Floating Sound” - Mari Ohno

“Nero ipogeo” - Roberto Zanata

“Les chants de la mer (Songs of the see)” - Gilles Fresnais

“1916” - Daria Baiocchi

“Apax” - Alexis Langevin-Tétrault

“usedlost” - Roger Alsop

“Inhabitated Places_Part III (Three Degrees of Inner Motion)” - Jones Margarucci

“Reverie of Solitude” - Kyle Vanderburg

“A Small Timequake // Of Shifts And Currents” - Cissi Tsang

“What you might have heard..’” - Nigel Frayne

“Cúige (Province)” - Cárthach Ó Nuanáin

 

Immersive Installations (Music Technology Area, IMERSD Live Room) 

“Fluctuant” - Mauricio Iregui and Toby Gifford 

“XIRMINJA NAHPY BERRY” - Pablo Sanz

 

Augmented Reality Soundwalks 

“Ambulation” - Tim Shaw (Sound Walk) 

“Tour(ist)” - James Partaik, Luc Lévesque and Hernando Barragan 

“CANOPY: Rainforest Listening 2.0” - Leah Barclay and Toby Gifford 




Monday July 11, 2016 09:00 - 12:30
Room 3.63 (Music Technology)

09:30

A NIME Primer
Limited Capacity seats available

This half-day tutorial is intended to provide a general and gentle introduction to the theory and practice of the design of interactive systems for music creation and performance. Our target audience consists of newcomers to the field who would like to start research projects, as well as interested students, people from other fields and members of the public with a general interest in the potential of NIME. We aim to give our audience an entry point to the theory and practice of musical interface design by drawing on case studies from previous years of the conference. Past attendees of the tutorial have told us that they gained a helpful perspective that helped them to increase their understanding and appreciation of their first NIME.

Presenters
avatar for Michael Lyons

Michael Lyons

Ritsumeikan University|Kyoto||Japan
Michael Lyons is a professor of Image Arts and Science at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto. His interest in experimental music dates to childhood backyard percussive improvisations, which were not consistently appreciated by the neighbours. As a teenager, Michael studied classical guitar and experimented with home-made analogue noise-making circuits and 1-bit Bach on a Motorola 6800 kit having only 2k of RAM. He has subsequently conducted research... Read More →


Monday July 11, 2016 09:30 - 12:30
3.66

09:30

Creative Coding I
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop will introduce creative coding audio for the Raspberry Pi, using the beads platform for audio programming, and the picode platform for inter-device communication and sensor data acquisition. We will demonstrate methods to allow each self-contained battery-powered device to acquire sensor data about its surroundings and the way it is being interacted with, as well as methods for designing systems where groups of these devices wirelessly communicate their state, allowing new interaction possibilities and approaches.

 

Presenters

Monday July 11, 2016 09:30 - 12:30
Conservatorium Room 1.21 Queensland Conservatorium

09:30

Learning to Program Haptic Interactions using Max: Applications with Sound
Limited Capacity seats available

In this workshop, participants will learn how to program force-feedback haptic interactions in Max. During the workshop, each participant will borrow a FireFader haptic device with the option of purchasing it at the end of the workshop.

When programmed in Max, audio signal flow is typically primarily unidirectional (top to bottom). In contrast, programming force feedback typically involves bidirectional audio-haptic signal flow between virtual physical elements. For this reason, programming haptic force feedback can seem daunting at first because it requires a physical way of thinking. This workshop aims to get participants easily up to speed by examining simple example haptic interactions in the familiar Max programming environment. Many of these examples are based on physical models and leverage Max’s palette of visualization objects to help communicate the means of operation to participants. More advanced examples help provide participants with specific insight into how haptics can be integrated into novel music compositions and sound art.

Presenters
avatar for Edgar Berdahl

Edgar Berdahl

Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University


Monday July 11, 2016 09:30 - 12:30
Conservatorium Room 1.39 Queensland Conservatorium

09:30

Making Musebots I
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract: This is a full day (6 hour) workshop on creating musebots. The workshop is suitable for NIME participants who are experienced coders in either MaxMSP, Max4Live, PD, Java, Extempore, and possibly SuperCollider. Participants should use their own laptops and software; we provide online links to templates in their language of choice.

Presenters
avatar for Oliver Bown

Oliver Bown

Senior Lecturer, UNSW Faculty of Art & Design, Interactive Media Lab
I am a researcher and maker working with creative technologies. I come from a highly diverse academic background spanning social anthropology, evolutionary and adaptive systems, music informatics and interaction design, with a parallel career in electronic music and digital art spanning over 15 years. I am interested in how artists, designers and musicians can use advanced computing technologies to produce complex creative works. My current... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Carey

Benjamin Carey

Casual Academic, University of Technology, Sydney | Creativity and Cognition Studios
Benjamin Carey is a Sydney-based saxophonist, composer and technologist with interests in contemporary classical, interactive, improvised and electro-acoustic music. Ben’s recent research and practice incorporates equal parts performance, composition and the development of musical software systems. He completed a PhD at the University of Technology, Sydney (2016), and has lectured in music technology and contemporary music at the University... Read More →
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →


Monday July 11, 2016 09:30 - 12:30
Conservatorium Boardroom Queensland Conservatorium

10:30

Sonic Environments Morning Tea and Coffee / Installations / Listening Room

The Sonic Environments program includes a diversity of installations and experiences happening continuously throughout the building. Please download PDF program below for further information on each work. 


Queensland Conservatorium Foyer 

“Aural Fabric: Greenwich” - Alessia Milo

“Reversed Masking” - Mauricio Iregui

 

Room 2.16 (Level 2) 

A’varitia - Silent Greed” - May Wing Joy Chang

 

Room 2.30 (Level 2) 

“Flight Variant” - Teresa Connors 

 

Room 2.26 (Level 2) 

“It is impossible to know about Earth.... so we must hear her voice in our own way” - Johann Diedrick

 

Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre  (Room 3.44, Level 3)  

“Delta Soundings” - Adam Molinski

“The Holy Well Suite” - Dallas Simpson

“Listening Earth” - Andrew Skeoch

“EcoRift Virtual Reality and The Listen(n) Project” - Garth Paine and Sabine Feisst  

“3D-Sound and VR-Audio Demo” - Sabine Breitsameter

“Vanuatu Women’s Water Music” - Sandy Sur and Tom Dick  

“Conservation VR Experiences” - QCRC Music Technology Research Focus Area Group  

“The Kaleidophone – a sonic collage of the Leweton Cultural Experience in Vanuatu” - Toby Gifford and Kate Genevieve

 

Sonic Environments Listening Room (Music Technology Area, Room 3.36) 

“Floating Sound” - Mari Ohno

“Nero ipogeo” - Roberto Zanata

“Les chants de la mer (Songs of the see)” - Gilles Fresnais

“1916” - Daria Baiocchi

“Apax” - Alexis Langevin-Tétrault

“usedlost” - Roger Alsop

“Inhabitated Places_Part III (Three Degrees of Inner Motion)” - Jones Margarucci

“Reverie of Solitude” - Kyle Vanderburg

“A Small Timequake // Of Shifts And Currents” - Cissi Tsang

“What you might have heard..’” - Nigel Frayne

“Cúige (Province)” - Cárthach Ó Nuanáin

 

Immersive Installations (Music Technology Area, IMERSD Live Room) 

“Fluctuant” - Mauricio Iregui and Toby Gifford 

“XIRMINJA NAHPY BERRY” - Pablo Sanz

 

Augmented Reality Soundwalks 

“Ambulation” - Tim Shaw (Sound Walk) 

“Tour(ist)” - James Partaik, Luc Lévesque and Hernando Barragan 

“CANOPY: Rainforest Listening 2.0” - Leah Barclay and Toby Gifford 



Monday July 11, 2016 10:30 - 11:00
Conservatorium's Foyer Queensland Conservatorium

11:00

Sonic Environments Papers 4 (stream A)

Leah Barclay: Griffith University Queensland Conservatorium

Biosphere Soundscapes: Exploring the art and science of listening to UNESCO Biosphere Reserves

Biosphere Soundscapes is a large-scale interdisciplinary research project underpinned by the creative possibilities of acoustic ecology, ecoacoustics and rapidly emerging fields of biology concerned with the study of environmental patterns and changes through sound. This project is designed to inspire communities across the world to listen to the environment and explore the value of sound as a measure for environmental health in UNESCO biosphere reserves. The project is delivered through immersive residencies with artists and scientists, research laboratories, intensive masterclasses and a diversity of creative projects spanning four continents. Biosphere reserves are sites recognised under UNESCO’s Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB) to promote innovative approaches to sustainable development. There are currently 669 biosphere reserves in 120 countries comprising terrestrial, marine and coastal ecosystems. Each biosphere reserve is designed and managed in a different way, but all seek to reconcile the conservation of biological and cultural diversity. They differ from world heritage sites in that they encourage active community participation and are ideal locations to test and demonstrate innovative approaches to ecosystem monitoring and sustainable development.

Biosphere Soundscapes draws on the inherently interdisciplinary nature of sound to explore cultural and biological diversity through accessible audio recording technologies, interdisciplinary creativity and environmental engagement with local and global communities.

This paper introduces the framework and methodology for Biosphere Soundscapes and explore the ecological, social and cultural contexts of UNESCO Biosphere Reserves through sound. This presentation will also introduce the potential role of acoustic ecology in the Lima Action Plan (2016-2025) adopted by UNESCO at the 4th World Congress of Biosphere Reserves in Lima, Peru in March 2016. Biosphere Soundscapes sits at the intersection of art and science, with the recordings providing valuable scientific data for biodiversity analysis and incredible source material for creative works that can bring awareness to these environments through new technologies. This project is designed as a platform for artists, scientists and global communities to collaborate and expose the creative and scientific possibilities of environmental sound to a global audience.


Ian Whalley: 
University of Waikato Conservatorium of Music

Exploring Internet Environments in Sound Arts 

Contemporary environmental sound art is often linked with geographically dispersed local cultural practice and/or natural environmental sound. And recently explored in tandem, the development of telematic sound arts are dominated by linking electroacoustic music studios and/or concert halls.  Yet urbanised life often involves inhabiting bodies, local environments and digitally interconnected global environments including people, computer-based agents, and aggregates real-time informational data streams. Current eResearch suggests this new environment will increase through: connectivity, greater bandwidth and processing power; smart/embedded technology and the Internet of Things; artificial intelligence and automated decision-making; data streams and making knowledge out of information with machine learning. What role can sonic art practices play in navigating increasingly complex relationships, represented particularly in multiple aggregated information flows?

Recent work on radical embodied cognition, reacting against older computational views of intelligence using symbolic processing and absent bodies, suggests human cognition is situated and time-pressured, is environmentally relational, used for action, and that much offline cognition is body-based. Accordingly, while current data streams, such as news feeds, can be rendered visually, we partly interpret these through mood, metaphor and movement, similar to music reception.


A meeting point for telematic sound arts and networked life that practitioner might further explore is in affective composition/performance models coupled with the sonification of real-time information streams. This involves further amalgamating research on the affective dimension of electroacoustic music with real-time data sonification techniques to extend performance-based electroacoustic music languages. And this process could further be automated with the integration of emerging research that adopts machine learning techniques in the gestural mapping of sound, together with the application of intelligent-agent decision making technology used in sound arts, thus enhancing rendering efficiency.

This allows for the sonic exploration of our place in a matrix of increasingly networked and non-liner relationships with dynamic meanings through creating new knowledge. And we may find new patterns in data streams only possible through aural means, allowing us reimagine our networked presence and relationship with place.


Vanessa Tomlinson, Jocelyn Wolfe, Bruce Wolfe and Erik Griswold.
Queensland Conservatorium

The Piano Mill

It has been suggested that as many as three out of four Australians may have had a piano by the end of the nineteenth century. (Rose 2008). In fact, between 1788 to 1888, Australia possessed more pianos per head of population than any other country. But how did the parlours, pianos, and their players, translate to the Queensland bush? The Piano Mill is in part an investigation of this story that connects place and music.

The Piano Mill is a purpose built structure and musical instrument in the Granite Belt near Stanthorpe, Qld. A collaboration between architect Bruce Wolfe and composer Erik Griswold, this structure houses 16 found pianos over 2 levels. The audience listens to the “mill” from outside, unable to view the workers (16 pianists) as they interpret Griswold’s score, Alls Grist That Comes to the Mill.

The Piano Mill, examines the pioneering history of Australia through the gaze of now discarded pianos; celebrating place, community, environment and above all, listening. This was constructed as a one-off performance event, probing ideas of nostalgia, transformation of land and function and the sheer joy of creativity.

This presentation will weave together the perspective of the architect, the composer, audience members, performers, and directors, to gain a kaleidoscopic view of the event that was the Piano Mill. As a piece of architecture, a sounded building, and an integral part of a larger artistic vision, this multi-dimensional approach is necessary to gleen something of the intense joy that has gathered in and around the mill. 

 


Moderators
SB

Sabine Breitsameter

Professor for Sound and Media Culture, Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences
Sabine Breitsameter (Berlin/Darmstadt) researches and teaches since 2006 as Professor for Sound and Media Culture at Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences. As an expert in experimental audio media, she has worked as dramaturge, director, editor and artist within the German public radio system, and as a director of festivals, symposia and exhibitions. In 2002-2008, she co-founded the Master’s program in “Sound Studies” at the University... Read More →

Presenters
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)


Monday July 11, 2016 11:00 - 12:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

11:00

Sonic Environments Papers 4 (stream B)

Mace Francis: Edith Cowan University

From Traffic Rises: Site Specificity and the Compositional Process

What happens when architectural spaces become the initial musical inspiration or compositional starting point for a new musical work? What unique musical material can they offer the compositional process? Approaching these spaces with this open mind set raises challenges, especially when the musical materials revealed in the space is outside the comfort zone of the composer. This paper examines a way to integrate the sound characteristics of an architectural space into the compositional process, and discusses how different levels of site-specificity may be engaged in this process.

My research grew from an interest in composing music for the acoustic problems of performance spaces rather than trying to resist them and led to an exploration of built environments which could be used to initiate musical material directly linked to the site. A pedestrian bridge was chosen for its unique sound and physical characteristics as well as challenges which required creating a pre-compositional testing and workshopping methodology.

These experimental processes inspired an original composition titled From Traffic Rises for eight acoustic musicians, electronics and four speakers.
This research also draws inspiration from literature in theatre and choreography that interrogates the way works can be linked to their particular site. In particular, Dr Fiona Wilkie’s scale of site-specificity for theatre provides a useful tool to gauge the level of site interaction. In addition, dance theorist, Victoria Hunter’s methodology for testing the possibilities of a site for an artwork has been employed in the early stages of engaging with the site.

These creative influences are synthesised to form an alternative compositional process which begins, and is informed by a physical space as a musical starting point. From Traffic Rises demonstrates that the acoustic and physical design features of a physical space can become an integral part of a new work, providing an important contribution to the possibilities of creating acoustic music.



Damian Castaldi

TAMBOURINE BAY 

Tambourine Bay is a multimodal work for large-scale, interactive video projection and live electroacoustic performance. It can be seen and heard as a window into the local weather patterns experienced in the Tambourine Bay Reserve, situated on the Lane Cove river, Sydney and represents a transition or dramatic shift in the climate over a 16 day period. Additional audio and text combine with this to reflect on more severe weather patterns across the east and west coast of Australia leading up to the Australia day long weekend. 

The work is scored for 51 percussionists and 100 tambourines. Additional instrumentation includes a percussive/string instrument with audio sensor interface using a Raspberry Pi Model B+, six fast vibration sensor switches, wire / aluminium frame, clear acrylic housing & miscellaneous electronic components; electronic & acoustic drums; cymbals & tambourines. 

The work combines these acoustic, electronic and handmade instruments in the performance of original music in the styles of Industrial/Upbeat/Electronica & Ambient/Soundtrack. It is experimental and partly improvisational, combining processed samples & location sound recording with live electronica, percussion and large scale interactive video projection. 

The video component of Tambourine Bay was first programmed for installation at the Balance-Unbalance International Conference 2013 in Noosa, Queensland, Australia from the 31st of March to the 2nd of June 2013. The single channel video work was presented in the ‘Earth to Earth’ sound venue throughout the conference proceedings. After participating in this event I started working on a large scale version of Tambourine Bay for performance and it is the development of this work that I will discuss in this Artist Talk.

Moderators
avatar for Nigel Frayne

Nigel Frayne

Director, Resonant Designs
Soundscape design for public spaces | World Forum for Acoustic Ecology | Australian Forum for Acoustic Ecology | | BIO: | Mr Nigel Frayne | Bachelor of Arts (Music) LaTrobe University, Melbourne | Graduate Diploma in Contemporary Music Technology, LaTrobe University, Melbourne | Director, Resonant Designs P/L., Melbourne | | Nigel Frayne is a Soundscape and Electroacoustic Designer with a background as a musician, sound engineer, and theatre... Read More →

Presenters
avatar for Damian Castaldi

Damian Castaldi

Director, The Last Bureau
Damian has a background in acoustic, instrumental, jazz and electronic drums & percussion, sound installation and audiovisual / performance art. He studied in the Sculpture, Performance and Installation (SPI) studios at Sydney College of the Arts in the mid 80’s and had the conceptual / artistic tuition and guidance of Tom Arthur, Vanetta Lagsdina, Mike Parr, Stelarc & Derek Kreckler. Following on from SCA he furthered his career with a... Read More →



Monday July 11, 2016 11:00 - 12:30
Conservatorium Room 2.14

11:00

Sonic Environments Papers 4 (stream C)

Sally Ann McIntyre: Independent Artist

Huia Transcriptions: re-collecting Colonial era witness accounts of extinct birdsong

In classical acoustic-ecological conceptions of the soundscape, the technological preservation of a sound mark might be understood to positively relate to the preserving of memory of place. But what of the sounds beyond (recorded) memory, that are already missing? Might there be value in suspending the fantasy of a natural plenitude of sonic fecundity, and its status as a potential recorded totality, to adequately acknowledge this haunting, or gap; to hear the past and present withdrawal of sound from an ecosystem and its soundscape, through ecological destruction? And once we have listened to this silence, how best to memorialise this loss? In a series of works focusing on what Dugal McKinnon has termed “ecological silencing” I explore the possibility for practice based research to investigate the lost birdsongs found within New Zealand colonial narratives, asking what it might mean to re- collect, through interventions into archival records, notation, and other material traces, the songs of bird species lost before the invention of recording technologies, and then to situate these lost songs back into hearing, including placing them back within what might be now listened to, and represented in phonographic or field recording practice, as the 'natural' soundscape.


Mara Helmuth

SONIC REFUGES 

Sonic Refuges are aural environments with internal interactions and logic that create individual gestures and organic textures with contextual and spatial dimensions. These refuges have a relationship to natural environments and may be based on source sounds from nature or synthesized algorithmic sounds. A “refuge” might be a peaceful soundscape for relaxation and deep listening, and a place for achieving balance and perspective on the complexities of life, from afar. It might also be a place where stimulating and unusual sounds can interact according to their own processes. 

Programming compositional and performing interfaces and granular synthesis instruments, allow me to construct dynamic imaginary sound spaces, some of which reveal or involve aspects of natural sounds. MaxMSP and RTcmix are the primary music programming languages used.


Peter Mcilwain

The Phonozoa Project

Peter will present recent work and discuss the theoretical aspects of his current project Phonozoa which is part of his ongoing exploration of imaginary sonic worlds and draws on ideas derived from affordance theory with particular emphasis on sound as a signifier of gesture. The Phonozoa project is a kind of pseudo-science enterpr ise where a zoology of imaginary creatures, called collectively phonozoa, is created in software. The juxtaposition of an imaginary world and scientific enterprise situates the work within a surrealist aesthetic. The creatures are designed with specific behaviours that generate motion, visual gesture and sound simultaneously and specific processes are used that make a tight coupling of these elements.  The talk will present examples from the project and related work, show some of the relevant technical aspects with particular reference to generative art practice and make comment on the broader aesthetic implications of the work. The presentation will include video examples as well as demonstrations of relevant code and generative techniques. 

 

Moderators
avatar for Stephan Moore

Stephan Moore

Lecturer, Northwestern University

Presenters
avatar for Mara Helmuth

Mara Helmuth

Professor, University of Cincinnati|Cincinnati|OH|USA
I'm a composer, computer musician, and researcher. I'm interested in interactivity, programming, networking, environmental issues, Asian studies and tennis.


Monday July 11, 2016 11:00 - 12:30
Conservatorium Room 2.15 Queensland Conservatorium

12:30

Sonic Environments Lunch Time Concert
A Filter of Noise: the Piano as Installation - Cornelis Fuhler

Love is Statistic Static', for piano, pianist and informal space, presents a number of techniques that use the piano as translator, instigator and intermedium for spacial conceptual ideas, and as amplifier for external sources from the outside world such as radio. In a ‘Fluxus-ian’ way, this composition/installation questions and juxtaposes the relationship between piano, pianist, media and audience.

Presenters
avatar for Cornelis Fuhler

Cornelis Fuhler

Since the mid 1980s Cor Fuhler (1964) is a Dutch/Australian active composer, multi instrumentalist, improviser, instrument builder, artist and inventor whose practice is an interdisciplinary one crossing into installation, dance, puppetry, comic strip, music theatre and site-specific performance. | His work has taken him on numerous tours around Europe, Canada, the USA, Indonesia, Japan, Brazil, Australia and New Zealand, and his recordings are... Read More →


Monday July 11, 2016 12:30 - 13:00
Conservatorium's Foyer Queensland Conservatorium

13:00

Creative Coding II
Limited Capacity seats available

Continuation of Creative Coding I

Presenters

Monday July 11, 2016 13:00 - 16:00
Conservatorium Room 1.21 Queensland Conservatorium

13:00

Making Musebots II
Limited Capacity seats available

Presenters
avatar for Oliver Bown

Oliver Bown

Senior Lecturer, UNSW Faculty of Art & Design, Interactive Media Lab
I am a researcher and maker working with creative technologies. I come from a highly diverse academic background spanning social anthropology, evolutionary and adaptive systems, music informatics and interaction design, with a parallel career in electronic music and digital art spanning over 15 years. I am interested in how artists, designers and musicians can use advanced computing technologies to produce complex creative works. My current... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Carey

Benjamin Carey

Casual Academic, University of Technology, Sydney | Creativity and Cognition Studios
Benjamin Carey is a Sydney-based saxophonist, composer and technologist with interests in contemporary classical, interactive, improvised and electro-acoustic music. Ben’s recent research and practice incorporates equal parts performance, composition and the development of musical software systems. He completed a PhD at the University of Technology, Sydney (2016), and has lectured in music technology and contemporary music at the University... Read More →
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →


Monday July 11, 2016 13:00 - 16:00
Conservatorium Boardroom Queensland Conservatorium

13:00

NIMEhub: Toward a Repository for Sharing and Archiving Instrument Designs
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop will explore the potential creation of a community database of digital musical instrument (DMI) designs. In other research communities, reproducible research practices are common, including open-source software, open datasets, established evaluation methods and community standards for research practice. NIME could benefit from similar practices, both to share ideas amongst geographically distant researchers and to maintain instrument designs after their first performances. However, the needs of NIME are different from other communities on account of NIME's reliance on custom hardware designs and the interdependence of technology and arts practice. This half-day workshop will promote a community discussion of the potential benefits and challenges of a DMI repository and plan concrete steps toward its implementation.

Presenters
avatar for Edgar Berdahl

Edgar Berdahl

Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University
avatar for Ivica Bukvic

Ivica Bukvic

Associate Professor (School of Performing Arts) and Senior Fellow (Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology), Virginia Tech, ICAT, L2Ork, DISIS
Ubiquitous Interactvity, Laptop and Mobile Orchestras, Raspberry Pi Instrument and Installation Design, Mindfulness through Technology, Discipline-Agnostic Creativity, Interactive Technology in K-12 (Elementary Through High School) Education
avatar for Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Associate Professor, Head of Department, University of Oslo|Oslo||Norway
Alexander Refsum Jensenius (BA, MA, MSc, PhD) is a music researcher and research musician working in the fields of embodied music cognition and new interfaces for musical expression (NIME). He is currently the Head of Department of Musicology at the University of Oslo, where he also holds an associate professorship in music technology. Alexander studied informatics, mathematics, musicology, piano performance and music technology at UiO, Chalmers... Read More →
avatar for Arve Knudsen

Arve Knudsen

CEO, ApresMIDI AB
Independent web application developer, specializing in JavaScript on the back-end and front-end. Developer of music hardware publishing app MuzHack (https://muzhack.com).
avatar for Michael Lyons

Michael Lyons

Ritsumeikan University|Kyoto||Japan
Michael Lyons is a professor of Image Arts and Science at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto. His interest in experimental music dates to childhood backyard percussive improvisations, which were not consistently appreciated by the neighbours. As a teenager, Michael studied classical guitar and experimented with home-made analogue noise-making circuits and 1-bit Bach on a Motorola 6800 kit having only 2k of RAM. He has subsequently conducted research... Read More →
avatar for Andrew McPherson

Andrew McPherson

Senior Lecturer, Queen Mary University of London|London||United Kingdom


Monday July 11, 2016 13:00 - 16:00
Conservatorium Room 1.39 Queensland Conservatorium

13:30

Sonic Environments Papers 5 (stream B)

Iris Garrelfs: University of the Arts London

Traces in/of/with Sound: the experience of audio-visual spatiality in

Traces in/of/with Sound was an audio-visual performance series, instigated as part of the author’s practice based PhD research into the process of sound arts practice. The initial idea for the project resides in the realm of visual music and an interest in the influence that the relationship between sound and image has on the music that is produced within performance. The research employed a modular methodology that includes creative practice as a key space - or in-vivo laboratory - in which the process of this practice can be studied.

As a piece of creative work, Traces in/of/with Sound made use of a field of juxtapositions: a projection of recorded and digitally mediated drawings with improvised and digitally processed voice; notions of archetypes across sound and vision; a range of complex conceptual concerns with a performative experience. In its inception, several strands of thought combined. These included recognising a similarity between Norman McLaren’s images (Barbeau 2005) and some of the author’s drawings; a concern with movement - as explored in her previous locative mobile phone pieces - that transferred onto the relationship between the eye’s movement and still images (Brown 2006). In addition, the notion of archetypes expressed through line drawings (Ingold 2007) and vocal expression met with digital processing techniques. Between 2011 and 2013, six performances and one installation took place, each with a different audio-visual spatial configuration, ranging from mono sound / single screen video to eight-channel sound / two screen video. Each of these versions brought with it adaptations of the core material, as a response to the preceding incarnation.

What remained stable was the method of performing: sound used live improvised voice, manipulated and diffused across a multichannel system (where applicable) via Cycling 74’s Max software. This sound material was created as an improvised response to a pre-prepared “film” of digitally manipulated drawings using Adobe Creative Suite packages Photoshop and Premiere.

As the series developed, working within this complex field of juxtapositions led to a change of focal points. Whilst the project began by essentially considering movement and a contrapuntal relationship between sound and vision as a property of time, it shifted to an exploration of a joint audio- visual spatiality, understood as a perceptual experience established by the interlaced movements of both sound and vision.

This paper will chart the development of the piece over a two- year research period from 2011-2013, including the presentation of relevant stereo extracts from the work. Within this narrative it will pay particular attention to the author’s emergent experience of audio-visual spatiality and its relationship with relevant theoretical concerns. Some conclusions as to strategies that may promote experiential coherence or disunity in the perception of an audience with respect to audio-visual space will also be put forward.

Louise Mackenzie, Richard Thompson and Paul Vickers: Department of Arts, Northumbria University, Department of Computer Science and Digital Technologies, Northumbria University and Department of Chemistry, Durham University

Alchemical Sensing: Creating an Embodied Experience of the Unseen Organism

This paper presents the research surrounding the audiovisual installation, Stars Beneath our Feet (2015) by Louise Mackenzie. It introduces the concept of alchemical sensing to describe the layered use of scientific technology in the context of an audio-visual art installation as an alternative frame of reference that attempts an embodied understanding of the unseen organism. The process of translation through layers of technology is considered as alchemical in reference to the ancient Greek and Egyptian origins of the tradition. Not alchemical in the sense of seeking immortality or turning metal into gold, but alchemical in the anima mundi sense of seeking out the ‘essence’ of matter. Referencing the development of the field of sonification, the acoustic artwork of Joe Davis and Katie Egan and of Anne Niemetz and Andrew Pelling, the use of Atomic Force Microscopy, Python, Photosounder and MAX MSP were employed to construct an embodied audio sense of the micro-organism, Dunaliella salina. Movements detected were translated using both sonification and audification techniques into sound files that were used to form the audio component of Stars Beneath Our Feet: an installation as part of Lumiere Durham 2015, a four- day international light festival produced in the UK by Artichoke. The video component of the installation was made using a combination of dark field microscopy and DSLR camera to produce moving images that focus on a perspective of micro-organisms that is other to that commonly used within scientific research. The objective of ‘looking at’ the organisms in this expanded manner and ‘listening to’ the sounds of data obtained via technological interpretation of the movement of micro- organisms in the context of an art installation adds a broader sensory dimension to our understanding of the unseen organism, one which encompasses their being in the world without consideration of their use as resources. https://vimeo.com/147120645

 


Moderators
Presenters
avatar for Louise Mackenzie

Louise Mackenzie

Artist, PhD Candidate, BxNU Institute of Contemporary Art, Northumbria University
Louise Mackenzie is an artist creating mixed media installations that explore life as medium. Recent works have included video and sound art on the agency of the micro-organism. Her current research explores living matter as material and questions the possibility of synthetic evolution. Louise received the New Graduate Award at Synthesis, Manchester Science Festival, 2013, was a finalist in the international Bio Art & Design Awards, 2015 and... Read More →


Monday July 11, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Conservatorium Room 2.14

13:30

Sonic Environments Papers 5 (stream A)
Nigel Frayne

Re-imagining a site-specific soundscape design project into a sonic art performance space.

Over the past 20 years or more I have been mostly involved the world of design, creating functional soundscapes in public spaces; zoos, memorials, architectural precincts and more. To assist my own comprehension of my activities I contend that design is about working with materials and art is about working with ideas. This distinction, while artificial and notional, recognises the very different qualities and performance parameters pertaining to each domain. This presentation intends to exemplify these differences in a discussion about the creation of the sound work, ‘What U might have heard..’ 

Merate Barakat - An Architectural Approach to The Soundwalk Method

A series of on-site surveys are conducted to observe possible qualitative aural pattern formations by using spatial measurements as fundamental parameters. The method assimilates the Soundwalk technique and the Relative Approach from the fields of soundscape and psychoacoustics, respectively. Soundwalking is an in situ technique typically used in soundscape research that can be designed to satisfy different research aims. It is a method that is highly dependent on the participating listener and the expected results. The Relative Approach is a method that considers the human response. These two site analysis methods are integrated within a customary architectural site-survey proposed to map the sonic morphology of urban spaces. 

Camilla Hannan -  Independent Artist 

F words: Feminism and field recording.

Is there such a thing as the female ear? What role does gender play in the genre of field recording?
If the field recordist objectifies the landscape in the same way that women are conventionally objectified, how is this reflected in the genre of field recording and associated sound art? And what are the implications when a woman becomes the protagonist in the landscape?

A gendered relationship between recordist and landscape impacts not only on the field recording process but also on the resulting project. It also reveals broader implications for the genre. Hannan will discuss her own practice in light of these considerations of gender. She argues that her preferences for site specific and radiophonic works are a result of these relationships. 

 

Moderators
LV

Lindsay Vickery

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia

Presenters
avatar for Nigel Frayne

Nigel Frayne

Director, Resonant Designs
Soundscape design for public spaces | World Forum for Acoustic Ecology | Australian Forum for Acoustic Ecology | | BIO: | Mr Nigel Frayne | Bachelor of Arts (Music) LaTrobe University, Melbourne | Graduate Diploma in Contemporary Music Technology, LaTrobe University, Melbourne | Director, Resonant Designs P/L., Melbourne | | Nigel Frayne is a Soundscape and Electroacoustic Designer with a background as a musician, sound engineer, and theatre... Read More →


Monday July 11, 2016 13:30 - 15:00
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

15:00

Sonic Environments Closing Remarks

Our final session features closing remarks from the conference organisers and guests in addition to the launch of Environmental Sound Artists, an incisive and imaginative look at the international environmental sound art movement published by Oxford University Press. 

 This session includes special guest Associate Professor Brydie-Leigh Bartleet, Director of the Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre (QCRC) who will reflect on the role of research that tackles the complex and multi-faceted possibilities that music plays in contemporary society. QCRC collaborates with national and international partners and stakeholders to cultivate projects that are creative and imaginative in content and design, interdisciplinary in nature, and dedicated to addressing the pressing needs of our time. 


Moderators
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
LV

Lindsay Vickery

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia

Presenters
BB

Brydie-Leigh Bartleet

Director, Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre | Deputy Director (Research), Queensland Conservatorium
SB

Sabine Breitsameter

Professor for Sound and Media Culture, Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences
Sabine Breitsameter (Berlin/Darmstadt) researches and teaches since 2006 as Professor for Sound and Media Culture at Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences. As an expert in experimental audio media, she has worked as dramaturge, director, editor and artist within the German public radio system, and as a director of festivals, symposia and exhibitions. In 2002-2008, she co-founded the Master’s program in “Sound Studies” at the University... Read More →

Performers
avatar for Stephan Moore

Stephan Moore

Lecturer, Northwestern University


Monday July 11, 2016 15:00 - 15:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

15:30

Sonic Environments Sound Walks and Augmented Reality Experiences
Sound walks and augmented reality experiences will be departing from the Conservatorium Foyer at 3:30pm exploring the South Bank Parklands. 

“Ambulation” - Tim Shaw (Sound Walk) 


“Tour(ist)” - James Partaik, Luc Lévesque and Hernando Barragan 

 

Presenters
TS

Tim Shaw

Culture Lab, Newcastle University|Newcastle-upon-Tyne|Tyne and Wear|UK


Monday July 11, 2016 15:30 - 16:30
Conservatorium's Foyer Queensland Conservatorium

16:30

Reception with Nibblies and Drinks
Monday July 11, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Conservatorium's Foyer Queensland Conservatorium

17:30

Keynote 1
Not Just Gadgets: Interfaces as tools towards empathy
and meaning.

Miya Masaoka
"I present a personal history of works with gestural
controllers, including Pieces with Plants, Ritual with Hissing
Madagascar Cockroaches, wherein interfaces provided a
direct relationship to society and/or the natural world, plants
and insects, and a means of tracking movement and
response into musical compositions and performances.
Included in this discussion will be LED KIMONO, a
responsive hand sewn responsive wearable coat with
hundreds of individually controlled LED’s and a live
presentation of the Laser Koto, an interface using midi, light
optical sensors and hundreds of samples (originally created
at CNMAT, UC Berkeley)".

Moderators
avatar for Andrew R. Brown

Andrew R. Brown

Professor of Digital Arts, Griffith University

Presenters
MM

Miya Massoka

Miya Masaoka resides in New York City and is a classically trained musician, composer and sound artist. She has created works for koto, laser interfaces, laptop and video, installations and written scores for ensembles, chamber orchestra and mixed choirs, and has led her own orchestra and numerous ensembles. Since forming and directing the San Francisco Gagaku Society, Masaoka has been creating new ways of thinking about and performing on the... Read More →


Monday July 11, 2016 17:30 - 18:30
Conservatorium's Theatre 2.66 Queensland Conservatorium

19:00

Concert 1


Performers
avatar for Garth Paine

Garth Paine

Associate Professor in Digital Sound and Interactive Media, Arizona State University|Tempe|Arizona|USA
Garth is particularly fascinated with sound as an experiential medium, both in musical performance and as an exhibitable object. This passion has led to several interactive responsive environments where the inhabitant generates the sonic landscape through their presence and behaviour. Garth has composed several music scores for dance generated through video tracking of the choreography, and more recently using Bio-Sensing on the dancers body. His... Read More →


Monday July 11, 2016 19:00 - 20:00
Conservatorium's Theatre 2.66 Queensland Conservatorium

20:30

Concert 2
  1. "DIADs - The Ford Transit…" Oliver Bown (Ian Hangar Recital Hall)
  2. "Blackbox Loops" Joe Cantrell   (Foyer)
  3. "Of Grating Imperma" Andrew Pfalz  (Foyer)
  4. "Doppelgänger" ³Macrophonics² (Donna Hewitt & Julian Knowles) (Ian Hangar Recital Hall)

Performers
AP

Andrew Pfalz

Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|LA|USA
avatar for Donna Hewitt

Donna Hewitt

Senior Lecturer in Music, University of New England|Armidale|NSW|Australia
music, wearable technologies
avatar for Joe Cantrell

Joe Cantrell

UC San Diego | CA | USA
avatar for Oliver Bown

Oliver Bown

Senior Lecturer, UNSW Faculty of Art & Design, Interactive Media Lab
I am a researcher and maker working with creative technologies. I come from a highly diverse academic background spanning social anthropology, evolutionary and adaptive systems, music informatics and interaction design, with a parallel career in electronic music and digital art spanning over 15 years. I am interested in how artists, designers and musicians can use advanced computing technologies to produce complex creative works. My current... Read More →


Monday July 11, 2016 20:30 - 22:00
Conservatorium's Foyer Queensland Conservatorium
 
Tuesday, July 12
 

09:00

Paper Session 1
  • "The Closed-Loop Robotic Glockenspiel: Improving Musical Robots with Embedded Musical Information Retrieval" Jason Long, Dale Carnegie, Ajay Kapur
  • "Electromagnetically Actuated Acoustic Amplitude Modulation Synthesis" Herbert H.C. Chang, Spencer Topel
  • "Tromba Moderna: A Digitally Augmented Medieval Instrument" Troels Hammer, Alex Baldwin, Edvinas Pechiulis, Peter Williams, Dan Overholt, Stefania Serafin
  • "3D-Sound and VR-Audio: Interfacing specific sound dramaturgies and new perceptional paradigms " Sabine Breitsameter

Moderators
GW

Ge Wang

Assistant Professor, Stanford University|Stanford|CA|United States

Presenters
SB

Sabine Breitsameter

Professor for Sound and Media Culture, Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences
Sabine Breitsameter (Berlin/Darmstadt) researches and teaches since 2006 as Professor for Sound and Media Culture at Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences. As an expert in experimental audio media, she has worked as dramaturge, director, editor and artist within the German public radio system, and as a director of festivals, symposia and exhibitions. In 2002-2008, she co-founded the Master’s program in “Sound Studies” at the University... Read More →
JL

Jason Long

Victoria University of Wellington|Wellington|Wellington|New Zealand
DO

Dan Overholt

AD:MT|Aalborg|Denmark|Denmark
avatar for Spencer Topel

Spencer Topel

Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College | Bregman Studios
I am a composer and sound artist with a research interest in acoustic synthesis and augmented instrument design.


Tuesday July 12, 2016 09:00 - 10:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

09:00

Installations
NIME Installations are running all day, please make time to visit them.

Musebot Chill-out Session - Arne Eigenfeld, Ollie Bown, Ben Carey - Rm 3.45

Pallas of Vines - Alexander Thumm - Rm 2.14

Carillion - Rob Hamilton, Chris Platz - Rm 3.63

Mayhem Machine - Marieke Verbiesen - Rm 2.30

Coronium 3500 - Scott Smallwood - Outside landing on the foyer



Presenters
avatar for Hamilton, Rob

Hamilton, Rob

Assistant Professor, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
avatar for Oliver Bown

Oliver Bown

Senior Lecturer, UNSW Faculty of Art & Design, Interactive Media Lab
I am a researcher and maker working with creative technologies. I come from a highly diverse academic background spanning social anthropology, evolutionary and adaptive systems, music informatics and interaction design, with a parallel career in electronic music and digital art spanning over 15 years. I am interested in how artists, designers and musicians can use advanced computing technologies to produce complex creative works. My current... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Carey

Benjamin Carey

Casual Academic, University of Technology, Sydney | Creativity and Cognition Studios
Benjamin Carey is a Sydney-based saxophonist, composer and technologist with interests in contemporary classical, interactive, improvised and electro-acoustic music. Ben’s recent research and practice incorporates equal parts performance, composition and the development of musical software systems. He completed a PhD at the University of Technology, Sydney (2016), and has lectured in music technology and contemporary music at the University... Read More →
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →


Tuesday July 12, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
TBA

11:00

Paper Session 2
  • "Action-Sound Latency: Are Our Tools Fast Enough?" Andrew McPherson, Robert Jack, Giulio Moro
  • "The Global Metronome: Absolute Tempo Sync ForNetworked Musical Performance" Reid Oda, Rebecca Fiebrink
  • "5500: a musical performance as data visualization" Tomas Laurenzo

Moderators
avatar for Serafin, Stefania

Serafin, Stefania

Aalborg University Copenhagen

Presenters
avatar for Tomas Laurenzo

Tomas Laurenzo

Assistant Professor, School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong|Hong Kong|Hong Kong|Hong Kong
Tomás Laurenzo is an artist and academic who works with both physical and digital media to explore the artistic construction of meaning and its relation with power and politics. | | Laurenzo’s production spans across different practices, including installation, interactive art, music, live cinema, and digital lutherie. His artworks and performances have been shown in the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Oceania. | He is Assistant Professor at... Read More →
avatar for Andrew McPherson

Andrew McPherson

Senior Lecturer, Queen Mary University of London|London||United Kingdom
RO

Reid Oda

Princeton University|Princeton|New Jersey|USA


Tuesday July 12, 2016 11:00 - 12:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

13:30

Demo & Poster 1
Posters
  • Towards a Perceptual Framework for Interface Design in Digital Environments for Timbre Manipulation (Sean Soraghan, Alain Renaud, Ben Supper) Table 3
  • Augmenting the iPad: The BladeAxe (Romain Michon, Julius Orion III Smith, Matthew Wright, Chris Chafe) Table 4
  • Towards a Mappable Database of Emergent Gestural Meaning (Doug Van Nort, Ian Jarvis, Michael Palumbo) Table 5
  • An Analogue Interface for Musical Robots (Jason Long, Ajay Kapur, Dale Carnegie) Table 6
  • The ‘Virtualmonium’: an instrument for classical sound diffusion over a virtual loudspeaker orchestra.(Natasha Barrett, Alexander Refsum Jensenius) Table 7
  • The Smartphone Ensemble. Exploring mobile computer mediation in collaborative musical performance(Julian Jaramillo Arango, Daniel Melán Giraldo) Table 8
  • Development of Fibre Polymer Sensor Reeds for Saxophone and Clarinet (Alex Hofmann, Vasileios Chatziioannou, Alexander Mayer, Harry Hartmann) Table 9
  • PdMIs: Embedded Acoustic DMIs Expressed through 3D Printing (Oliver Hancock, Todd Cochcrane) Table 10
  • Transforming 8-Bit Video Games into Musical Interfaces via Reverse Engineering and Augmentation(Benjamin Olson) Table 11
  • Musician and Mega-Machine: Compositions Driven by Real-Time Particle Collision Data from the ATLAS Detector (Juliana Cherston, Ewan Hill, Steven Goldfarb, Joseph Paradiso) Table 12
  • Mapping Everyday Objects to Digital Materiality in The Wheel Quintet: Polytempic Music and Participatory Art (Anders Lind, Daniel Nylén) Table 13
  • Haptic Music Player - Synthetic audio-tactile stimuli generation based on the notes´ pitch and instruments´ envelope mapping (Alfonso Balandra, Hironori Mitake, Shoichi Hasegawa) Table 14
  • Notation for 3D Motion Tracking Controllers: A Gametrak Case Study (Madeline Huberth, Chryssie Nanou) Table 15
  • Embodiment on a 3D tabletop musical instrument (Edgar Hemery, Sotiris Manitsaris, Fabien Moutarde) Table 16
  • Networked Virtual Environments as Collaborative Music Spaces (Cem Çakmak, Anıl Çamcı, Angus Forbes) Table 19
  • Drum-Dance-Music-Machine: Construction of a Technical Toolset for Low-Threshold Access to Collaborative Musical Performance (Christine Steinmeier, Dominic Becking, Philipp Kroos) Table 20
  • The Laptop Accordian (Aidan Meacham, Sanjay Kannan, Ge Wang) Table 21
  • Music Maker: 3d Printing and Acoustics Curriculum (Sasha Leitman, John Granzow) Table 22
  • The Hexenkessel: A Hybrid Musical Instrument for Multimedia Performances (Jacob Sello) Table 23
  • Snare Drum Performance Motion Analysis (Robert Van Rooyen, Andrew Schloss, George Tzanetakis) Table 24
  • Active Acoustic Instruments for Electronic Chamber Music (Otso Lähdeoja) Table 29
  • SensorChimes: Musical Mapping for Sensor Networks (Evan Lynch, Joseph Paradiso) Table 30
  • NAKANISYNTH: An Intuitive Freehand Drawing Waveform Synthesiser Application for iOS Devices (Paul Haimes, Kyosuke Nakanishi, Tetsuaki Baba, Kumiko Kushiyama) Table 31
  • StrumBot – An Overview of a Strumming Guitar Robot (Richard Vindriis, Dale Carnegie) Table 32
  • Unfoldings: Multiple Explorations of Sound and Space (Tim Shaw, Simon Bowen, John Bowers) Table 33
  • BlockyTalky: A Physical and Distributed Computer Music Toolkit for Kids (Benjamin Shapiro, Rebecca Fiebrink, Matthew Ahrens, Annie Kelly) Table 34
  • XronoMorph: Algorithmic Generation of Perfectly Balanced and Well-Formed Rhythms (Andrew J. Milne, Steffen A. Herff, David Bulger, William A. Sethares, Roger T. Dean) Table 35
  • Focal : An Eye-Tracking Musical Expression Controller (Stewart Greenhill, Cathie Travers) Table 36
Demos
  • The Haptic Capstans: Rotational Force Feedback for Music using a FireFader Derivative Device (Eric Sheffield, Edgar Berdahl, Andrew Pfalz) Table 1–2
  • Electromagnetically Actuated Acoustic Amplitude Modulation Synthesis (Herbert H.C. Chang, Spencel Topel) Table 17–18
  • Dooremi: a Doorway to Music (Rebecca Kleinberger, Akito Van Troyer) Table 25–26
  • A Multi-Point 2D Interface: Audio-Rate Signals for Controlling Complex Multi-Parametric Sound Synthesis(Stuart James) Table 27–28
  • Multi Rubbing Tactile Instrument (Yoichi Nagashima) Room 1.21
  • The Extended Clarinet (Carl Jörgen Normark, Robert Ek, Peter Parnes, Harald Andersson) Room 1.39
  • SpectraScore VR: Networkable virtual reality software tools for real-time composition and performance(Benedict Carey) Room 3.66


Presenters
JJ

Julian Jaramillo Arango

Universidad de Caldas|Manizales|Caldas|Colombia
AB

Alfonso Balandra

Tokyo Institute of Technology|Tokyo|Tokyo|Japan
OC

Omer Cem Cakmak

Istanbul Technical University|Istanbul||Turkey
BC

Benedict Carey

HfMT-Hamburg|Hamburg||Germany
JC

Juliana Cherston

MIT Media Lab|Cambridge|MA|02139
PH

Paul Haimes

Tokyo Metropolitan University|Hino-shi|Tokyo|Japan
avatar for Alex Hofmann

Alex Hofmann

Assistant Professor, University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna|Vienna||Austria
Live Electronics with Saxophone | Csound, SuperCollider | Rapsberry Pi
MH

Madeline Huberth

Stanford University|Stanford|CA|USA
avatar for Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Associate Professor, Head of Department, University of Oslo|Oslo||Norway
Alexander Refsum Jensenius (BA, MA, MSc, PhD) is a music researcher and research musician working in the fields of embodied music cognition and new interfaces for musical expression (NIME). He is currently the Head of Department of Musicology at the University of Oslo, where he also holds an associate professorship in music technology. Alexander studied informatics, mathematics, musicology, piano performance and music technology at UiO, Chalmers... Read More →
OL

Otso Lahdeoja

University of the Arts, Sibelius Academy|Helsinki||Finland
avatar for Sasha Leitman

Sasha Leitman

Stanford University|stanford|CA|USA
JL

Jason Long

Victoria University of Wellington|Wellington|Wellington|New Zealand
avatar for Evan Lynch

Evan Lynch

Research Assistant, MIT Media Lab
AM

Aidan Meacham

Stanford University|Stanford|California|United States
RM

Romain Michon

CCRMA - Stanford University|Stanford|CA|USA
avatar for Yoichi Nagashima

Yoichi Nagashima

Professor, Shizuoka University of Art and Culture|Hamamatsu|Shizuoka|JAPAN
DV

Doug Van Nort

York University|Toronto|Ontario|Canada
BO

Ben Olson

Signal Narrative|Madison|WI|United States
AR

Alexandra Rieger

Dartmouth |Hanover|New Hampshire|
avatar for Robert Van Rooyen

Robert Van Rooyen

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Victoria|Victoria|British Columbia|Canada
As an experienced multidisciplinary engineer and musician, I am keenly interested in robotics that can render "human like" performances. Exploring the nuances and translating them to stochastic multidimensional motion control that can render comparable performances is of particular interest.
avatar for Dominik Schlienger

Dominik Schlienger

University of the Arts Helsinki|Helsinki||Finland
I'm researching kinaesthetic interfaces for spatially inetractive arts. I'm working on a tracking system using acoustic localisation techniques. Currently, I'm desperate to find a Max MSP Gen~ object which does frequency - domain convolution/correlation to implement the whole system in Max. Please contact me if you have one!
JS

Jacob Sello

HfMT Hamburg|Hamburg|Hamburg|Germany
TS

Tim Shaw

Culture Lab, Newcastle University|Newcastle-upon-Tyne|Tyne and Wear|UK
ES

Eric Sheffield

Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|Louisiana|United States
SS

Sean Soraghan

Research Engineer, ROLI|London||United Kingdom
avatar for Christine Steinmeier

Christine Steinmeier

Research Assistant, FH Bielefeld University of Applied Sciences | Minden | Germany
RV

Richard Vindriis

Victoria University of Wellington|Wellington|Wellington|New Zealand


Tuesday July 12, 2016 13:30 - 15:00
Basil Jones Orchestral Hall 1.82 Queensland Conservatorium

15:30

Paper Session 3
  • "A Web Application for Audience Participation in Live Music Performance: The Open Symphony Use Case" Leshao Zhang, Yongmeng Wu, Mathieu Barthet
  • "Understanding Cloud Support for the Audience Participation Concert Performance of Crowd in C[loud]" Antonio Deusany de Carvalho Junior, Sang Won Lee, Georg Essl
  • "Game Design for Expressive Mobile Music" Ge Wang
  • "Design and evaluation of a gesture driven wave field synthesis auditory game" Jan Banas, Razvan Paisa, Iakovos Vogiatzoglou, Francesco Grani, Stefania Serafin

Moderators
AJ

Andrew Johnston

University of Technology Sydney|Sydney|NSW|Australia

Presenters
avatar for Sang Won Lee

Sang Won Lee

PhD Candidate., University of Michigan|Ann Arbor|Michigan|United States
GW

Ge Wang

Assistant Professor, Stanford University|Stanford|CA|United States
LZ

Leshao Zhang

Queen Mary University of London|London||United Kingdom


Tuesday July 12, 2016 15:30 - 17:00
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

18:00

Concert 3
  1. "Lexicon Sonate" Karheinz Essl
  2. "Improvisations with the other" Sean Foran
  3. "Machine Songs" Arne Eigenfeldt
  4. "Barely a Piano" Andrew Sorensen
  5. "Improvising with Tango" Henning Berg
  6. "Chunk" Cat Hope and Stuart James

Presenters
SJ

Stuart James

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia

Performers
AS

Andrew Sorensen

Australian National University
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →
avatar for Cat Hope

Cat Hope

Associate Dean (Research), Edith Cowan Univeristy
digital graphic notation - low frequency sound - experimental music performance - digital archives for music and software - artistic research - artists in the academy -
FS

Foran, Sean

Griffith University|Brisbane|QLD|
avatar for Henning Berg

Henning Berg

Professor for Jazz Trombone, Hochschule fuer Musik und Tanz, Koeln
Computer-Human Improvisation, Interactive Music Software
avatar for Karlheinz Essl

Karlheinz Essl

Professor of Composition, University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna
Born 1960 in Vienna. Austrian composer, performer, improviser, media artist and composition teacher. | | He studied composition in Vienna with Friedrich Cerha and completed his studies in musicology with a doctoral thesis on Anton Webern. As a double bassist, he played in chamber ensembles and experimental jazz bands. | | Essl was composer-in-residence at the Darmstadt Summer School (1990-94) and at IRCAM in Paris (1991-93). Between... Read More →


Tuesday July 12, 2016 18:00 - 19:30
Conservatorium's Theatre 2.66 Queensland Conservatorium

20:00

Concert 4
  1. "Quartet for Strings" Stephen Beck
  2. "TRI=NITRO" Yoshihito Nakanishi
  3. "Causeway" Jesse Allison
  4. "Bio-vortex: Exploring Wet" Ben Freeth
  5. "Just Her - Jester - Gesture" Georg Hajdu

Performers
BF

Ben Freeth

Newcastle University|Newcastle|Tyne and Wear|England
GH

Georg Hajdu

Hochschule für Musik und Theater|Hamburg|Hamburg|Germany
avatar for Jesse Allison

Jesse Allison

Experimental Music & Digital Media, Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|LA|United States
Jesse Allison is a professor at LSU in Experiment Music & Digital Media. As part of the AVATAR initiative, he is actively performing research and collaboration into ways that technology can expand what is possible in the arts. As an artist, Allison has disseminated works and research around the globe through live performance art, interactive installations, virtual and hybrid worlds installations, and paper presentations. Allison received his... Read More →
avatar for Stephen David Beck

Stephen David Beck

Associate Vice President, Office of Research & Economic Development, Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|Louisiana|USA
Stephen David Beck is the Derryl and Helen Haymon Professor of Composition and Computer Music at the LSU School of Music. He currently serves as Associate Vice President for the LSU Office of Research and Economic Development. | | He received his PhD in music composition and theory from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1988, where he studied with Henri Lazarof, Elaine Barkin, Alden Ashforth, Paul Reale and Roger Bourland. From... Read More →
avatar for Yoshihito Nakanishi

Yoshihito Nakanishi

Researcher, Nihon University College of Art


Tuesday July 12, 2016 20:00 - 21:00
Conservatorium's Theatre 2.66 Queensland Conservatorium

22:00

Concert 5
  1. "Danger Music No. 85" Travis Thatcher and Peter Bussigel (Foyer)
  2. "Cosmo Collective" Bernt Isak Wærstad (Foyer)
  3. "Losperus" Stephan Moore and Scott Smallwood (Foyer)
  4. "Augmented Drum-Kit: Path Finder" Christos Michalakos (Ian Hangar)

Performers
avatar for Bernt Isak Wærstad

Bernt Isak Wærstad

University Lecturer / Freelance, Norwegian University for Science and Technology and Norwegian Academy of Music|Trondheim/Oslo||Norway
Musician, sound artist, producer and sound designer with a Masters in Music Technology from NTNU in real time granular synthesis of electric guitar. In addition to work free lance as a musician and sound engineer, he teaches at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and the Norwegian Academy of Music and also works as a sound designer, studio technician and producer in Pipa Lydbyrå (http://www.pipalydbyraa.no). He is also part of... Read More →
avatar for Christos Michalakos

Christos Michalakos

Lecturer, Abertay University
Christos is a composer, performer, sound artist and software developer. His work explores the relationships between sound, space, games and bespoke performance environments. | | He has presented works and talked at a wide range of conferences and festivals including the London Jazz Festival (London 2015), Game Developers Conference (San Francisco 2015), ACM Creativity and Cognition (Glasgow 2015), New Interfaces for Musical Expression (Oslo... Read More →
PB

Peter Bussigel

University of Virginia|Charlottesville|Virginia|United States
avatar for Scott Smallwood

Scott Smallwood

Associate Professor, University of Alberta
Scott Smallwood is a sound artist, composer and performer who creates works inspired by discovered textures and forms, through a practice of listening, field recording, and sonic improvisation. He frequently creates works using custom instruments, software, and site specific environments. He has collaborated with musicians, dancers, video artists, sculptors and others, and regularly performs as one-half of the duo Evidence (with Stephan Moore... Read More →
avatar for Stephan Moore

Stephan Moore

Lecturer, Northwestern University


Tuesday July 12, 2016 22:00 - 23:00
Conservatorium's Foyer Queensland Conservatorium
 
Wednesday, July 13
 

09:00

Paper Session 4
  • "The Perception of Live-sequenced Electronic Music via Hearing and Sight" Mehmet Aydın Baytaş, Tilbe Göksun, Oğuzhan Özcan
  • "Skip the Pre-Concert Demo: How Technical Familiarity and Musical Style Affect Audience Response" S. Astrid Bin, Nick Bryan-Kinns, Andrew P. McPherson
  • "Evaluating the Audience’s Perception of Real-time Gestural Control and Mapping Mechanisms in Electroacoustic Vocal Performance" Jiayue Cecilia Wu, Madeline Huberth, Yoo Hsiu Yeh, Matt Wright
  • "Live Writing : Writing as a Real-time Audiovisual Performance" Sang Won Lee, Georg Essl, Mari Martinez

Moderators
avatar for Amy Alexander

Amy Alexander

UC San Diego

Presenters
MA

Mehmet Aydin Baytas

Koç University|Istanbul||Turkey
SM

S. M. Astrid Bin

Queen Mary University of London|London||UK
MH

Madeline Huberth

Stanford University|Stanford|CA|USA
avatar for Sang Won Lee

Sang Won Lee

PhD Candidate., University of Michigan|Ann Arbor|Michigan|United States


Wednesday July 13, 2016 09:00 - 10:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

09:00

Installations
NIME Installations are running all day, please make time to visit them.

Musebot Chill-out Session - Arne Eigenfeld, Ollie Bown, Ben Carey - Rm 3.45

Pallas of Vines - Alexander Thumm - Rm 2.14

Carillion - Rob Hamilton, Chris Platz - Rm 3.63

Mayhem Machine - Marieke Verbiesen - Rm 2.30

Coronium 3500 - Scott Smallwood - Outside landing on the foyer

Fluctuant - Mauricio Iregui, Leah Barklay, Toby Gifford - Rm 3.62

 

Presenters
avatar for Hamilton, Rob

Hamilton, Rob

Assistant Professor, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
avatar for Oliver Bown

Oliver Bown

Senior Lecturer, UNSW Faculty of Art & Design, Interactive Media Lab
I am a researcher and maker working with creative technologies. I come from a highly diverse academic background spanning social anthropology, evolutionary and adaptive systems, music informatics and interaction design, with a parallel career in electronic music and digital art spanning over 15 years. I am interested in how artists, designers and musicians can use advanced computing technologies to produce complex creative works. My current... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Carey

Benjamin Carey

Casual Academic, University of Technology, Sydney | Creativity and Cognition Studios
Benjamin Carey is a Sydney-based saxophonist, composer and technologist with interests in contemporary classical, interactive, improvised and electro-acoustic music. Ben’s recent research and practice incorporates equal parts performance, composition and the development of musical software systems. He completed a PhD at the University of Technology, Sydney (2016), and has lectured in music technology and contemporary music at the University... Read More →
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →
avatar for Toby Gifford

Toby Gifford

General Chair, NIME 2016
avatar for Mauricio Iregui

Mauricio Iregui

NIME/SONIC ENVIRONMENTS Organizing Committee


Wednesday July 13, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
TBA

11:00

Paper Session 5
  • "The HandSolo: A Hand Drum Controller for Natural Rhythm Entry and Production" Kunal Jathal, Tae-Hong Park
  • "The 'E' in QWERTY: Musical Expression with Old Computer Interfaces" Chris Nash
  • "Focal : An Eye-Tracking Musical Expression Controller" Stewart Greenhill, Cathie Travers
  • "The Laptop Accordion" Aidan Meacham, Sanjay Kannan, Ge Wang

Moderators
avatar for Andrew McPherson

Andrew McPherson

Senior Lecturer, Queen Mary University of London|London||United Kingdom

Presenters
avatar for Stewart Greenhill

Stewart Greenhill

Researcher, Data Scientist
avatar for Kunal Jathal

Kunal Jathal

Music Technologist, New York University
Obsessed with music, media, problem solving, physics, philosophy, and telling stories.
CN

Chris Nash

Senior Lecturer in Music Technology, University of the West of England|Bristol||United Kingdom
Chris Nash is a professional programmer and composer, and currently Senior Lecturer in Music Technology (Soft ware Development for Audio, Sound, and Music) at the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol, UK). He completed his PhD on music HCI at the University of Cambridge, looking at theoretical and analytical methods for modeling and designing interfaces for composition, supported by a longitudinal study of over 1,000 DAW users... Read More →


Wednesday July 13, 2016 11:00 - 12:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

13:30

Demo & Poster 2
Posters
  • MalletOTon and the Modulets: Modular and Extensible Musical Robots (Ajay Kapur, Jim Murphy, Michael Darling, Eric Heep, Bruce Lott, Ness Morris) Table 3
  • speaker.motion: A Mechatronic Loudspeaker System for Live Spatialisation (Bridget Johnson, Michael Norris, Ajay Kapur) Table 4
  • Transdisciplinary Methodology: from Theory to the Stage, Creation for the SICMAP (Barah Héon-Morissette) Table 5
  • Kinéphone: Exploring the Musical Potential of an Actuated Pin-Based Shape Display (Xiao Xiao, Donald Derek Haddad, Thomas Sanchez, Akito van Troyer, Rébecca Kleinberger, Penny Webb, Joe Paradiso, Tod Machover, Hiroshi Ishii) Table 6
  • Church Belles: An Interactive System and Composition Using Real-World Metaphors (Si Waite) Table 7
  • residUUm: user mapping and performance strategies for multilayered live audiovisual generation (Ireti Olowe, Giulio Moro, Mathieu Barthet) Table 8
  • Pendula: An Interactive Swing Installation and Performance Environment (Kiran Bhumber, Nancy Lee, Brian Topp) Table 9
  • Hitmachine: Collective Musical Expressivity for Novices (Kasper Buhl Jakobsen, Marianne Graves Petersen, Majken Kirkegaard Rasmussen, Jens Emil Groenbaek, Jakob Winge, Jeppe Stougaard) Table 10
  • Rhizomatic Approaches to Screen-Based Notation (Lindsay Vickery) Table 11
  • 3D Modelling and Printing of Microtonal Flutes (Matthew Dabin, Kraig Grady, Terumi Narushima, Stephen Beirne, Christian Ritz) Table 12
  • Csound Instruments On Stage (Alex Hofmann, Bernt Waerstad, Kristoffer Koch) Table 13
  • Controlling Complex Virtual Instruments – A Setup with note~ for Max and Prepared Piano Sound Synthesis(Thomas Resch, Stefan Bilbao) Table 14
  • Emovere: Designing Sound Interactions for Biosignals and Dancers (Javier Jaimovich) Table 15
  • Designing a Flexible Workflow for Complex Real-Time Interactive Performances (Esteban Gómez, Javier Jaimovich) Table 16
  • Driftwood: Redefining Sound Sculpture Controllers (Alexandra Rieger, Spencer Topel) Table 19
  • Leimu: Gloveless Music Interaction Using a Wrist Mounted Leap Motion (Dom Brown, Nathan Renney, Adam Stark, Chris Nash, Tom Mitchell) Table 20
  • Music Aid - Towards a Collaborative Experience for Deaf and Hearing People in Creating Music (Ene Alicia Søderberg, Rasmus Emil Odgaard, Sarah Bitsch, Oliver Høeg-Jensen, Nikolaj Schildt Christensen, Søren Dahl Poulsen, Steven Gelineck) Table 21
  • The Prospects of Musical Instruments For People with Physical Disabilities (Jeppe Larsen, Dan Overholt, Thomas B. Moeslund) Table 22
  • SoundMorpheus: A Myoelectric-Sensor Based Interface for Sound Spatialization and Shaping (Christopher Benson, Bill Manaris, Seth Stoudenmier, Timothy Ward) Table 23
  • PORTAL: An Audiovisual Laser Performance System (Gorkem Ozdemir, Anil Camci, Angus Forbes) Table 24
  • Materiality for Musical Expressions: an Approach to Interdisciplinary Syllabus Development for NIME (Rikard Lindell, Koray Tahiroglu, Morten Riis, Jennie Schaeffer) Table 29
  • Frontiers: Expanding Musical Imagination With Audience Participation (Marcelo Gimenes, Pierre-Emmanuel Largeron, Eduardo Miranda) Table 30
  • PourOver: A Sensor-Driven Generative Music Platform (Kevin Schlei, Chris Burns, Aidan Menuge) Table 31
  • Hacking NIMEs (Abram Hindle) Table 32
  • Drumming with style: From user needs to a working prototype (Sergi Jordá, Daniel Gómez-Marín, Ángel Faraldo, Perfecto Herrera) Table 33
  • Understanding Cloud Service in the Audience Participation Music Performance of Crowd in C[loud] (Sang Won Lee, Antonio Deusany de Carvalho Junior, Georg Essl) Table 34
  • An Interactive Software Instrument for Real-time Rhythmic Concatenative Synthesis (Cárthach Ó Nuanáin, Sergi Jordà, Perfecto Herrera) Table 35
Demos
  • Wireless Vibrotactile Tokens for Audio-Haptic Interaction with Touchscreen Interfaces (Edgar Berdahl, Danny Holmes, Eric Sheffield) Table 1–2
  • Very Slack Strings: A Physical Model and Its Use in the Composition “Quartet for Strings” (Edgar Berdahl, Andrew Pfalz, Stephen David Beck) Table 17–18
  • A Musical Game of Bowls Using the DIADs (Sam Ferguson, Oliver Bown) Table 25–26
  • x2Gesture: how machines could learn expressive gesture variations of expert musicians (Christina Volioti, Sotiris Manitsaris, Eleni Katsouli, Athanasios Manitsaris) Table 27–28
  • Headline grabs for music: The development of the iPad score generator for “Loaded (NSFW)” (Cat Hope, Stuart James, Aaron Wyatt) Room 1.21
  • How to Stop Sound: Creating a light instrument and ‘Interruption’ a piece for the Mimerlaven, Norberg Festival 2015. (Ben Eyes, Laurits Esben Jongejan) Room 1.39
  • Tango: Software for Computer-Human Improvisation (Henning Berg) Room 3.66

Presenters
avatar for Christopher Benson

Christopher Benson

Graduate Research Assistant, College Of Charleston
Chris Benson studied Classical Guitar Performance, Computing in the Arts and Computer Science at the University of South Carolina and the College of Charleston. | | He is currently in the Computer Science masters program at the College of Charleston. His graduate research is focused in the creation of hyper-instruments and development in psycho-acoustic 3D audio renderings to create more immersive listening/performance experiences.
avatar for Edgar Berdahl

Edgar Berdahl

Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University
avatar for Kiran Bhumber

Kiran Bhumber

Musician / New Media Artist, University of British Columbia|Vancouver|British Columbia|Canada
Kiran Bhumber is a musician, new media artist and educator based in Vancouver. Her work focuses on movement and interactions through exploring the undeniable physical nature of sound. These themes are manifested through creating interactive systems which track gesture to create reactive environments in musical performances and participatory installations. She is currently involved in a variety of musical projects and teaches music technology... Read More →
DB

Dom Brown

University of the West of England|Bristol|Avon|
BE

Ben Eyes

University of York |York|NORTH YORKSHIRE|United Kingdom
avatar for Marcelo Gimenes

Marcelo Gimenes

KTP Associate, Plymouth University
Pianist, composer and experimental electronic musician Marcelo Gimenes’ career includes a comprehensive array of activities in different settings and styles, from classical to contemporary music and jazz improvisation. He is particularly interested in exploring music as an interactive medium through which people communicate and interconnect. To achieve that, he develops bespoke technological tools that are incorporated in his performances... Read More →
DG

Daniel Gomez

Universitat Pompeu Fabra|Barcelona|Barcelona|Spain
BH

Barah Héon-Morissette

Université de Montréal|Montréal|Québec|Canada
AH

Abram Hindle

University of Alberta|Edmonton|Alberta|Canada
avatar for Alex Hofmann

Alex Hofmann

Assistant Professor, University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna|Vienna||Austria
Live Electronics with Saxophone | Csound, SuperCollider | Rapsberry Pi
KB

Kasper Buhl Jakobsen

Aarhus University, Department of Computer Science|Aarhus|8210|Denmark
SJ

Stuart James

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia
AK

Ajay Kapur

Associate Dean of Research and Development in Digital Arts, California Institute of the Arts
avatar for Bill Manaris

Bill Manaris

Professor, Computing in the Arts, College of Charleston|Charleston|South Carolina|United States
Bill Manaris is a computer science researcher, educator, and musician. He is Professor of Computer Science, and Director of Computing in the Arts at the College of Charleston, SC, USA. His interests include human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence, and the intersection of computing and the arts. He explores interaction design and modeling of human aesthetics and creativity via statistical, connectionist, and evolutionary techniques. He... Read More →
avatar for Terumi Narushima

Terumi Narushima

Senior Lecturer in Music, University of Wollongong
DO

Dan Overholt

AD:MT|Aalborg|Denmark|Denmark
avatar for Gorkem Ozdemir

Gorkem Ozdemir

Istanbul Technical University|Istanbul||Turkey
TR

Thomas Resch

Universitiy of Music Basel, FHNW|Basel||Switzerland
avatar for Kevin Schlei

Kevin Schlei

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee|Milwaukee|Wisconsin|United States
ES

Eric Sheffield

Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|Louisiana|United States
avatar for Koray Tahiroğlu

Koray Tahiroğlu

Research Fellow, Aalto University|Espoo||Finland
http://sopi.aalto.fi/
LV

Lindsay Vickery

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia
CV

Christina Volioti

UNIVERSITY OF MACEDONIA|THESSALONIKI||GREECE
SW

Si Waite

Staffordshire University|Stoke-on-Trent|Staffordshire|UK

Performers
avatar for Henning Berg

Henning Berg

Professor for Jazz Trombone, Hochschule fuer Musik und Tanz, Koeln
Computer-Human Improvisation, Interactive Music Software


Wednesday July 13, 2016 13:30 - 15:00
Basil Jones Orchestral Hall 1.82 Queensland Conservatorium

15:30

Paper Session 6
  • "Reflection On Action in NIME Research: Two Complementary Perspectives" Benjamin Carey, Andrew Johnston
  • "XronoMorph: Algorithmic Generation of Perfectly Balanced and Well-Formed Rhythms" Andrew J. Milne, Steffen A. Herff, David Bulger, William A. Sethares, Roger T. Dean
  • "An Interactive Software Instrument for Real-time Rhythmic Concatenative Synthesis" Cárthach Ó Nuanáin, Sergi Jordà, Perfecto Herrera
  • "Coronium 3500: A Solarsonic Installation for Caramoor" Scott Smallwood

Moderators
avatar for Cat Hope

Cat Hope

Associate Dean (Research), Edith Cowan Univeristy
digital graphic notation - low frequency sound - experimental music performance - digital archives for music and software - artistic research - artists in the academy -

Presenters
avatar for Benjamin Carey

Benjamin Carey

Casual Academic, University of Technology, Sydney | Creativity and Cognition Studios
Benjamin Carey is a Sydney-based saxophonist, composer and technologist with interests in contemporary classical, interactive, improvised and electro-acoustic music. Ben’s recent research and practice incorporates equal parts performance, composition and the development of musical software systems. He completed a PhD at the University of Technology, Sydney (2016), and has lectured in music technology and contemporary music at the University... Read More →
AJ

Andrew Johnston

University of Technology Sydney|Sydney|NSW|Australia
avatar for Andrew Milne

Andrew Milne

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, MARCS Institute, Western Sydney University|Sydney|NSW|Australia
I am a research fellow at the MARCS Institute, Western Sydney University, working with Roger Dean to develop computational models of music perception/cognition and to use these models to drive creative musical outputs.
CN

Cárthach Ó Nuanáin

Universitat Pompeu Fabra|Barcelona|Barcelona|Spain
avatar for Scott Smallwood

Scott Smallwood

Associate Professor, University of Alberta
Scott Smallwood is a sound artist, composer and performer who creates works inspired by discovered textures and forms, through a practice of listening, field recording, and sonic improvisation. He frequently creates works using custom instruments, software, and site specific environments. He has collaborated with musicians, dancers, video artists, sculptors and others, and regularly performs as one-half of the duo Evidence (with Stephan Moore... Read More →


Wednesday July 13, 2016 15:30 - 17:00
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

18:00

Conference Dinner at the Alfred and Constance
Address: 

Web: http://www.alfredandconstance.com.au/

 Ph: (07) 3251 6500 

Located on the corner of Alfred & Constance Streets in Fortitude Valley. Wickham and Constance Streets are one-way streets so the easiest route to take to A&C is via St. Pauls Tce.

There is on street parking but it can sometimes be tricky to find a spot!So, when you dine with us Secure Parking is available at the Valley Metro Car Park (on Alfred St.). Just have a staff member validate your ticket before you leave.

Please note: Mon to Fri until 5 is validated for 2.5 hrs only


Wednesday July 13, 2016 18:00 - 20:00
Alfred and Constance Restaurant 130 Constance St, Fortitude Valley QLD 4006

20:30

Concert 6 - The New Globe Theatre
  1. "Powder Box" Yoshihito Nakanishi
  2. "Membranes" Atsushi Tadokoro
  3. "Live Writing: Gloomy Streets" Sang Won Lee
  4. "Splice" Andrew Sorensen

Performers
AS

Andrew Sorensen

Australian National University
avatar for Atsushi Tadokoro

Atsushi Tadokoro

Keio University
avatar for Sang Won Lee

Sang Won Lee

PhD Candidate., University of Michigan|Ann Arbor|Michigan|United States
avatar for Yoshihito Nakanishi

Yoshihito Nakanishi

Researcher, Nihon University College of Art


Wednesday July 13, 2016 20:30 - 21:30
The New Globe Theatre 220 Brunswick St, Fortitude Valley QLD 4006

22:00

Concert 7 - The New Globe Theatre
  1. "Deformed Electronic Dance Music" Paul Vandemast-Bell
  2. "Ndial Performance" Peter Bussigel
  3. "Owego System Trade Routes" Shawn Lawson
  4. "KET Conversations" Koray Tahiroğlu
  5. “Hollow Vertices” Norah Lorway, Kiran Bhumber, Nancy Lee
 

Presenters
avatar for Kiran Bhumber

Kiran Bhumber

Musician / New Media Artist, University of British Columbia|Vancouver|British Columbia|Canada
Kiran Bhumber is a musician, new media artist and educator based in Vancouver. Her work focuses on movement and interactions through exploring the undeniable physical nature of sound. These themes are manifested through creating interactive systems which track gesture to create reactive environments in musical performances and participatory installations. She is currently involved in a variety of musical projects and teaches music technology... Read More →

Performers
avatar for Koray Tahiroğlu

Koray Tahiroğlu

Research Fellow, Aalto University|Espoo||Finland
http://sopi.aalto.fi/
NL

Norah Lorway

Lecturer in Creative Music Technology, Falmouth University
PB

Peter Bussigel

University of Virginia|Charlottesville|Virginia|United States
avatar for Shawn Lawson

Shawn Lawson

Associate Professor, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute|Troy|New York|United States
Shawn Lawson is an experiential media artist exploring the computational sublime with technologies like: stereoscopy, camera vision, touch screens, game controllers, mobile devices, random number generators, live-coding, and real-time computer graphics. His artwork has exhibited in museums, galleries, festivals, and public space in England, Denmark, Spain, Russia, Italy, Korea, Portugal, Brazil, Turkey, Malaysia, Iran, Canada, and across the... Read More →


Wednesday July 13, 2016 22:00 - 23:00
The New Globe Theatre 220 Brunswick St, Fortitude Valley QLD 4006
 
Thursday, July 14
 

09:00

Installations
NIME Installations are running all day, please make time to visit them.

Musebot Chill-out Session - Arne Eigenfeld, Ollie Bown, Ben Carey - Rm 3.45

Pallas of Vines - Alexander Thumm - Rm 2.14

Carillion - Rob Hamilton, Chris Platz - Rm 3.63

Mayhem Machine - Marieke Verbiesen - Rm 2.30

Fluctuant - Mauricio Iregui, Leah Barclay, Toby Gifford - Rm 3.62 

Coronium 3500 - Scott Smallwood - Outside landing on the foyer


Presenters
avatar for Hamilton, Rob

Hamilton, Rob

Assistant Professor, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
avatar for Leah Barclay

Leah Barclay

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Griffith University
Co-Chair, Sonic Environments (www.sonicenvironments.org)
avatar for Oliver Bown

Oliver Bown

Senior Lecturer, UNSW Faculty of Art & Design, Interactive Media Lab
I am a researcher and maker working with creative technologies. I come from a highly diverse academic background spanning social anthropology, evolutionary and adaptive systems, music informatics and interaction design, with a parallel career in electronic music and digital art spanning over 15 years. I am interested in how artists, designers and musicians can use advanced computing technologies to produce complex creative works. My current... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Carey

Benjamin Carey

Casual Academic, University of Technology, Sydney | Creativity and Cognition Studios
Benjamin Carey is a Sydney-based saxophonist, composer and technologist with interests in contemporary classical, interactive, improvised and electro-acoustic music. Ben’s recent research and practice incorporates equal parts performance, composition and the development of musical software systems. He completed a PhD at the University of Technology, Sydney (2016), and has lectured in music technology and contemporary music at the University... Read More →
avatar for Arne Eigenfeldt

Arne Eigenfeldt

Professor, Music and Technology, Simon Fraser University|Vancouver|BC|Canada
Arne Eigenfeldt is a composer of acoustic and electroacoustic music, and is an active software designer. His music has been performed throughout the world, and his research in intelligent music systems has been published and presented in international conferences. He teaches music and technology at SFU’s School for the Contemporary Arts, is a co-director of the Metacreation Lab, and is a founding partner of Metacreative Technologies... Read More →
avatar for Toby Gifford

Toby Gifford

General Chair, NIME 2016
avatar for Mauricio Iregui

Mauricio Iregui

NIME/SONIC ENVIRONMENTS Organizing Committee


Thursday July 14, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
TBA

11:00

Paper Session 7
  • "A Multi-Point 2D Interface: Audio-Rate Signals for Controlling Complex Multi-Parametric Sound Synthesis" Stuart James
  • "Acoustic Localisation for Spatial Reproduction of Moving Sound Source: Application Scenarios & Proof of Concept" Dominik Schlienger
  • "Towards a perceptual framework for interface design in digital environments for timbre manipulation" Sean Soraghan, Alain Renaud, Ben Supper
  • "Minimally Invasive Gesture Sensing Interface (MIGSI) for Trumpet" Sarah Reid, Ryan Gaston, Colin Honigman, Ajay Kapur

Moderators
avatar for Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Associate Professor, Head of Department, University of Oslo|Oslo||Norway
Alexander Refsum Jensenius (BA, MA, MSc, PhD) is a music researcher and research musician working in the fields of embodied music cognition and new interfaces for musical expression (NIME). He is currently the Head of Department of Musicology at the University of Oslo, where he also holds an associate professorship in music technology. Alexander studied informatics, mathematics, musicology, piano performance and music technology at UiO, Chalmers... Read More →

Presenters
SJ

Stuart James

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia
AK

Ajay Kapur

Associate Dean of Research and Development in Digital Arts, California Institute of the Arts
avatar for Dominik Schlienger

Dominik Schlienger

University of the Arts Helsinki|Helsinki||Finland
I'm researching kinaesthetic interfaces for spatially inetractive arts. I'm working on a tracking system using acoustic localisation techniques. Currently, I'm desperate to find a Max MSP Gen~ object which does frequency - domain convolution/correlation to implement the whole system in Max. Please contact me if you have one!
SS

Sean Soraghan

Research Engineer, ROLI|London||United Kingdom


Thursday July 14, 2016 11:00 - 12:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

13:30

Keynote 2

New Interfaces ≠ Musical Expression? 

Over the last two decades, the NIME community has seen an explosion of innovative and inspired discourse around the development of new musical interfaces. 

In reviewing the literature, I find it useful to ask myself how musical expression is situated in the discourse and in what ways the development of new interfaces supports both exploration of existing musical approaches whilst inspiring new approaches and musical practice. 

In older instrumental music traditions a range of constraints produce an idiomatic language for each instrument and genre. Established techniques and modes of expression have led to a shared pedagogy, a common literature, a collective understanding and base for the extension and evolution of technique. These foundations appear to foster a rich practice with community- wide sharing and promulgation of the instruments’ oeuvre and pedagogy. 

What can we learn from the way in which acoustic instrument constraints act as a catalyst for broad community uptake of instruments and their perseverance as tools for musical expression? Furthermore, how can we apply these lessons in a NIME context where one-off experimental interfaces are often a unique and short-lived expression of individualism rather than designed for broad community uptake? How can we apply these lessons to commercially focused interfaces which are often marketed as being playable in many different postures; standing, using a strap, placing the interface on a table, and as trigger interface or nuanced continuous controller? These marketing approaches appear to be more driven from an industrial consciousness that seeks a chameleon, a machinic assemblage, defined by context rather than a tool for musical expression. Certainly, attention to the NIME proceedings as an archive of research in the area may assist the establishment of a common base for understanding and a comparative framework for the evolution of our shared work. 

This talk will address these questions by seeking out the ‘musical’ in the interface. I ask where the relationship between control and musical output becomes embodied and how we can develop mappings and musical algorithms that produce an intimate and tight morphological relationship between the input actions and the musical outcome, across a wide range of musical genres. 

I will discuss some of my own studies that focus on the parametric space associated with acoustic musical instrument performance and extrapolate some pointers towards a design paradigm driven from an embodied, somatic analysis of interface engagement. 


Moderators
avatar for Toby Gifford

Toby Gifford

General Chair, NIME 2016

Presenters
avatar for Garth Paine

Garth Paine

Associate Professor in Digital Sound and Interactive Media, Arizona State University|Tempe|Arizona|USA
Garth is particularly fascinated with sound as an experiential medium, both in musical performance and as an exhibitable object. This passion has led to several interactive responsive environments where the inhabitant generates the sonic landscape through their presence and behaviour. Garth has composed several music scores for dance generated through video tracking of the choreography, and more recently using Bio-Sensing on the dancers body. His... Read More →


Thursday July 14, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

15:00

Paper Session 8
  • "Non-intrusive Counter-actions: Maintaining Progressively Engaging Interactions for Music Performance" Koray Tahiroğlu, Juan Gomez Vasquez, Johan Kildal
  • "BlockyTalky: A Physical and Distributed Computer Music Toolkit for Kids" R. Benjamin Shapiro, Rebecca Fiebrink, Matthew Ahrens, Annie Kelly.
  • "One Knob To Rule Them All: Reductionist Interfaces for Expansionist Research" John Bowers, John Richards, Tim Shaw, Jim Frieze, Ben Freeth, Sam Topley, Neal Spowage, Steve Jones, Amit Patel, Li Rui
  • Trends at NIME - Reflections on Editing "A NIME Reader" Alexander Refsum Jensenius, Michael J. Lyons

Moderators
avatar for Sasha Leitman

Sasha Leitman

Stanford University|stanford|CA|USA

Presenters
JB

John Bowers

Culture Lab and Fine Art, Newcastle University|Newcastle upon Tyne||United Kingdom
avatar for Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Associate Professor, Head of Department, University of Oslo|Oslo||Norway
Alexander Refsum Jensenius (BA, MA, MSc, PhD) is a music researcher and research musician working in the fields of embodied music cognition and new interfaces for musical expression (NIME). He is currently the Head of Department of Musicology at the University of Oslo, where he also holds an associate professorship in music technology. Alexander studied informatics, mathematics, musicology, piano performance and music technology at UiO, Chalmers... Read More →
AK

Annie Kelly

PhD Student, Lab for Playful Computation
avatar for Koray Tahiroğlu

Koray Tahiroğlu

Research Fellow, Aalto University|Espoo||Finland
http://sopi.aalto.fi/


Thursday July 14, 2016 15:00 - 16:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

16:30

Town Hall
Thursday July 14, 2016 16:30 - 17:30
Ian Hanger Recital Hall 2.10 Queensland Conservatorium

18:00

Concert 8
  1. "Music for various groups of performers (after Lucier)" Richard Cyngler
  2. "Composition #1 for PIGS (Percussive Image Gestural System)" Amy Alexander & Curt Miller
  3. "Ritual for Karlax" D. Andrew Stewart
  4. "Morphosis for piano" Zubin Kanga

Presenters
Performers
avatar for Amy Alexander

Amy Alexander

UC San Diego
DA

D. Andrew Stewart

University of Lethbridge
ZK

Zubin Kanga

University of Nice/IRCAM|Nice and Paris||France


Thursday July 14, 2016 18:00 - 19:00
Conservatorium's Theatre 2.66 Queensland Conservatorium

20:00

Concert 9
  1. "Detritus (2015)" Lindsay Vickery
  2. "A Minor Chord for BladeAxe" Michon Romain
  3. "Everything In Its Place" Nicole Carroll
  4. "Live Performance for Leappmotion" Jonghyun Kim
  5. "From Uganda" Mara Helmuth, Stephen David Beck and Scott Smallwood

Presenters
Performers
avatar for Jonghyun Kim

Jonghyun Kim

Lecturer, KyungHee University | Seoul | South Korea
Composer / Software Developer | | Jonghyun Kim studied composition, piano, and computer programming at Kyung Hee University in Seoul, Hochschule für Musik in Freiburg. | | His pieces have been performed in University of North Texas(USA), Griffith University(Australia), ZKM(Germany), Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Musikhochschule Freiburg, and accepted at several international computer music festivals, such as ICMC 2015, Nime... Read More →
LV

Lindsay Vickery

Edith Cowan University|Perth|Western Australia|Australia
avatar for Mara Helmuth

Mara Helmuth

Professor, University of Cincinnati|Cincinnati|OH|USA
I'm a composer, computer musician, and researcher. I'm interested in interactivity, programming, networking, environmental issues, Asian studies and tennis.
avatar for Nicole Carroll

Nicole Carroll

Brown University|Providence|Rhode Island|United States
RM

Romain Michon

CCRMA - Stanford University|Stanford|CA|USA
avatar for Scott Smallwood

Scott Smallwood

Associate Professor, University of Alberta
Scott Smallwood is a sound artist, composer and performer who creates works inspired by discovered textures and forms, through a practice of listening, field recording, and sonic improvisation. He frequently creates works using custom instruments, software, and site specific environments. He has collaborated with musicians, dancers, video artists, sculptors and others, and regularly performs as one-half of the duo Evidence (with Stephan Moore... Read More →
avatar for Stephen David Beck

Stephen David Beck

Associate Vice President, Office of Research & Economic Development, Louisiana State University|Baton Rouge|Louisiana|USA
Stephen David Beck is the Derryl and Helen Haymon Professor of Composition and Computer Music at the LSU School of Music. He currently serves as Associate Vice President for the LSU Office of Research and Economic Development. | | He received his PhD in music composition and theory from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1988, where he studied with Henri Lazarof, Elaine Barkin, Alden Ashforth, Paul Reale and Roger Bourland. From... Read More →


Thursday July 14, 2016 20:00 - 21:30
Basil Jones Orchestral Hall 1.82 Queensland Conservatorium

22:00

Concert 10
  1. "Taking the Auspices" Zubin Kanga & Benjiman Carey
  2. "Light Traces" Jon Drummond
  3.  Dj Sniff

Presenters
avatar for Benjamin Carey

Benjamin Carey

Casual Academic, University of Technology, Sydney | Creativity and Cognition Studios
Benjamin Carey is a Sydney-based saxophonist, composer and technologist with interests in contemporary classical, interactive, improvised and electro-acoustic music. Ben’s recent research and practice incorporates equal parts performance, composition and the development of musical software systems. He completed a PhD at the University of Technology, Sydney (2016), and has lectured in music technology and contemporary music at the University... Read More →

Performers
JD

Jon Drummond

University of Technology, Sydney|Sydney|NSW|Australia
ZK

Zubin Kanga

University of Nice/IRCAM|Nice and Paris||France


Thursday July 14, 2016 22:00 - 23:30
Conservatorium's Foyer Queensland Conservatorium
 
Friday, July 15
 

09:00

Unconference Workshops
Details and registration links here:
http://nime2016.org/unconference

Friday July 15, 2016 09:00 - 16:00
The Edge Auditorium The Edge, State Library of Queensland

19:30

Concert 11 (Unconference)
Performers include: Hetleveiker, LopezDonado, Sonic Manipulator and Feet Teeth

Friday July 15, 2016 19:30 - 21:30
The Edge Auditorium The Edge, State Library of Queensland